& cplSiteName &

FCC's 'Middle Ground' Already Under Attack

Carol Wilson
4/24/2014
50%
50%

The reactions to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) 's new net neutrality proposals have been swift and predictable even though those proposals haven't even been formally announced yet.

In advance of the expected announcement today, multiple news outlets are reporting that Chairman Tom Wheeler is circulating a proposal that seeks a middle ground. It would allow broadband ISPs to offer premium access to companies that want to carve out guaranteed high-speed bandwidth for their services, as long as such access was commercially available to all on reasonable terms.

Just the fact that anyone would be able to pay for premium services is drawing howls of protest and claims that both President Obama and Wheeler are reneging on their support for a free and open Internet. (See Wheeler Writes Regulatory Rubric and Wheeler Walks Line on Net Neutrality.)

In a Common Cause press release, former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps, now a special adviser to Common Cause's Media and Democracy Reform Initiative, said: "If true, this proposal is a huge step backwards and must be stopped. If the Commission subverts the Open Internet by creating a fast lane for the 1 percent and slow lanes for the 99 percent, it would be an insult to both citizens and to the promise of the Net."

The Wall Street Journal, which broke the story Wednesday , claims the winners in the net neutrality wars would be the broadband ISPs, who would be able to make money selling services to both consumers and content providers, and larger content companies such as Google (Nasdaq: GOOG), Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL), and Netflix Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX), who can pay more to make sure their content reaches consumers with higher quality. (See Netflix CEO Wants 'Strong' Net Neutrality .)

But broadband providers, many of whom are announcing financial results this week, are being more measured in their responses.

"We have to see what's ultimately embedded in the proposal," said Time Warner Cable Inc. (NYSE: TWC) Chairman & CEO Rob Marcus. "At this stage, it's difficult to speculate until we know what's contemplated.”

Asked about possible new business models for offering Internet video content, Marcus said it was "premature" to discuss. "We'll have to see what new business models emerge," he said.

The new rules were made necessary by a January court ruling that struck down the FCC's previous rules in a challenge brought by Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE: VZ). According to the Journal, the FCC would require broadband ISPs to disclose more information about their networks and would retain the right to decide on a case-by-case basis on the fairness and reasonableness of the commercial terms broadband ISPs have set. (See Net Neutrality Fight Not Over.)

UPDATE 11.30 AM EST: FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is "setting the record straight" in a blog you can read here , in which he says the FCC's proposal to be circulated today would set "a high bar" for what is commercially reasonable. In addition, he says the agency will solicit other approaches to preventing "behavior harmful to consumers or competition by limiting the openness of the Internet."

— Carol Wilson, Editor-at-Large, Light Reading

(31)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Page 1 / 4   >   >>
brookseven
50%
50%
brookseven,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 7:26:38 PM
Re: Fundamental arguments
Mitch,

Plan on the next Congressional Action to be around 2050.  If we take the two Telecom Acts, you will see over 60 years separated them.

So, don't expect anything in your lifetime from Congress.

seven
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/29/2014 | 6:49:47 PM
Re: Fundamental arguments
brookseven - "Universal Service has never applied to anything other than common carriers."

That could, of course, change if Congress chooses to do so. 
RolfSperber
50%
50%
RolfSperber,
User Rank: Light Beer
4/29/2014 | 2:53:00 AM
Net Neutrality
Net Neutrality melts down to a political slogan, at least in Germany. Acces lines from 384 KBit/sec up to 100 MBit/sec depending on where you live make an "equal rights" internet virtually impossible. In backbone and core we have best effort, a vaque idea of net neutrality. What could be done would be to build a virtual infrastructure with elements from different carriers split into a high quality virtual section with the possibility to guarantee bandwidth and QoS for individual clients and a neutral section, guaranteeing bandwidth to all clients of this section.
Liz Greenberg
50%
50%
Liz Greenberg,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 1:54:46 PM
Re: Fundamental arguments
I with you @seven.  Back in the day voice was "the" service for everybody.  Now it it is the internet carrying everything including voice.  Given that and the carriers push to VoIP only, it only makes sense to declare all carriers as "common carriers" and subject them all to the same rules.
brookseven
50%
50%
brookseven,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 1:35:03 PM
Re: Fundamental arguments
Mitch,

 

Universal Service has never applied to anything other than common carriers.

 

seven

 
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/28/2014 | 12:10:34 PM
Re: Fundamental arguments
We can have universal service without subjecting ISPs to common carrier status though. 
SachinEE
50%
50%
SachinEE,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 10:56:24 AM
Re: Fundamental arguments
The recent circulating proposal that seeks to allow broadband ISPs to offer premium access to companies that would like to curve out guaranteed high speed bandwidth internet connectivity for the services that they provide should be scrutinized a lot. This is simply because, it will bring about bias, favoring broad band ISPs, who will take advantage to make a lot of money by selling their services both to their clients and to content providers. This will limit the citizen's democratic and fundamental right to access and use open internet. 
brookseven
50%
50%
brookseven,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 10:02:13 AM
Re: Fundamental arguments
Mitch,

Universal Service was required to make phone service ubiquitous.  Can't see why it wouldn't be required for high speed BB.

I have said mandatory High Speed BB as a required service should be put in place and ISPs should be common carriers.

seven

 
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/28/2014 | 12:17:11 AM
Re: Fundamental arguments
I remember a discussion back when DSL was emerging to compete with cable. DSL advocates said the problem with cable is that you're sharing the Internet with all your neighbors. Cable advocates responded that in either case, you're sharing the Internet with ... the entire Internet. 

In your opinion (and the opinion of others reading this thread) would the US be better off if the FCC used the nuclear option and declared Internet service providers to be common carriers?
brookseven
50%
50%
brookseven,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/24/2014 | 8:24:49 PM
Re: Fundamental arguments
Of course, I would already argue there is a content fast lane.  Cable calls that the non-DOCSIS channels.  U-verse calls it broadband TV.  So, I am stunned that anyone thinks there can be no premium content lanes since they exist already.  We were working with Verizon to do long tail content over Switched Digital Video over IP and give it higer QoS than Internet service.

Interesting thing about this....the cable and telcos PAY the content owners for the priviledge of being able to show this content.  Now the reality is that Netflix is not a content owner...its a content aggregator.  I wonder if the cable cos and telcos would be able to pull this with Hulu Plus.  I think not.

And the rest of the services (outside of video) do not care very much about these hyper lane QoS deals.

seven

 
Page 1 / 4   >   >>
From The Founder
Download our complete guide to de-risking NFV deployment in 2016, including:
  • An eight-step strategy to deploying NFV safely, based on input from the companies that have already started virtualizing their production networks.
  • Interviews with leading executives at Colt, AT&T, Deutsche Telekom, Cisco, Nokia, ZTE, Ericsson and Heavy Reading.
  • Flash Poll
    Live Streaming Video
    Prepping for the Future: Upskill U Explained
    During this short kick-off video, Doug Webster, Vice President of Service Provider Marketing, Cisco, and Light Reading’s CEO & Founder Steve Saunders give an overview of Upskill U.
    LRTV Documentaries
    LRTV Report: Mobile Core Innovation

    4|28|16   |   25:32   |   (0) comments


    Hear from multiple industry experts from Deutsche Telekom, SK Telecom, Heavy Reading, Huawei, Cisco, Ericsson, Nokia, NEC and many more about developments in the mobile core as operators virtualize their IMS and evolved packet core systems and prepare for a 5G world.
    LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
    NFV World Congress Highlight

    4|26|16   |     |   (0) comments


    The highlight of the NFV World Congress contains exciting telecom news. Join us for an inside look at Huawei's ICT 2020 plan and its latest collaboration with industry leaders.
    LRTV Interviews
    Unified Comms Finds Its Voice

    4|25|16   |   03:44   |   (0) comments


    Peter Quinlan, VP of UCC Product Management at Tata Communications, talks about the evolution of the unified communications and collaboration services sector and how voice is now a big part of current developments.
    LRTV Documentaries
    So... What Do We Do Now?

    4|25|16   |   03:24   |   (0) comments


    After a long hiatus, Max Dingman, the CEO of a GeeGhiz, returns for a motivational board room pep talk.
    LRTV Documentaries
    NAB 2016 Highlights

    4|21|16   |     |   (0) comments


    Light Reading's Cable/Video Practice Leader Alan Breznick climbs down from the slots to tell us about the latest news in broadcast technology at NAB 2016 in Las Vegas.
    Between the CEOs
    CEO Chat: Deepfield's Craig Labovitz

    4|21|16   |     |   (0) comments


    In this latest installment of the CEO Chat series, Craig Labovitz, co-founder and CEO of Deepfield, sits down with Light Reading's Steve Saunders in Light Reading's New York City office to discuss how Deepfield fits in with the big data trend and more.
    Shades of Ray
    Leading Lights 2016: Shortlists Announced

    4|20|16   |   0:53   |   (0) comments


    The judging is over and the Leading Lights 2016 shortlists have been published -- you can see who made the cut by clicking on this link.
    LRTV Custom TV
    Introducing MulteFire – Qualcomm at MWC 2016

    4|18|16   |   3.29   |   (0) comments


    MulteFire is the latest option for using LTE in unlicensed spectrum. As oppose to its close 'siblings', LAA and LTE-U, MulteFire operates solely in unlicensed spectrum, which enables it to offer the best of two worlds – LTE-like performance with WiFi-like deployment simplicity. In this interview, Sanjeev Athalye, Sr. Director, Product Management at Qualcomm ...
    Between the CEOs
    CEO Chat: Grant Van Rooyen of Cologix

    4|18|16   |     |   (0) comments


    Grant van Rooyen, president and CEO of Cologix, sits down with Steve Saunders, founder and CEO of Light Reading, in the vendor's New Jersey facility to offer an inside look at the company's success story and discuss the importance of security in the telecom industry.
    LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
    ONS 2016 – Demonstration of Huawei's NetMatrix Multi-Vendor SDN Orchestrator

    4|15|16   |     |   (0) comments


    This demonstration shows how Huawei's NetMatrix SDN Orchestrator (SDN-O) addresses an operator's core service agility needs for services spanning multi-domain, multivendor networks: it includes a demonstration of:
    - Rapid New Service Design: using YANG to model a complex example of multi-domain, multivendor L3VPN network connectivity service that ...
    LRTV Custom TV
    AT&T Wants to Own North Carolina

    4|15|16   |     |   (1) comment


    Venessa Harrison, president of North Carolina for AT&T, tells how the company will expand its GigaPower service beyond the seven N.C. cities it already serves.

  • This blog, sponsored by AT&T, is the second part of a ten-part series examining next-generation broadband technologies titled "Behind the Speeds."
  • LRTV Interviews
    Will NC Be First Gigabit State?

    4|15|16   |     |   (1) comment


    Alan Fitzpatrick, co-founder of Charlotte Hearts Gigabit, spells out the state's progress in at least starting to wire nearly every major market for gigabit service.
    Upcoming Live Events
    May 23, 2016, Austin, TX
    May 23, 2016, Austin Convention Center
    May 24-25, 2016, Austin Convention Center, Austin, TX
    September 13-14, 2016, The Curtis Hotel, Denver, CO
    December 6-8, 2016,
    June 16-18, 2017, Austin Convention Center, Austin, TX
    All Upcoming Live Events
    Infographics
    A new survey conducted by Heavy Reading and TM Forum shows that CSPs around the world see the move to digital operations as a necessary part of their overall virtualization strategies.
    Hot Topics
    Ultra-Broadband Summit, Hong Kong
    Iain Morris, News Editor, 4/27/2016
    GoT Fans Curse HBO (Not Right) Now
    Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 4/25/2016
    Mitel Asks: What Time of Day Do You Shower?
    Mitch Wagner, West Coast Bureau Chief, Light Reading, 4/25/2016
    Analysts More Than Bullish on Comcast MVNO
    Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 4/22/2016
    Charter Jumps Gun on TWC Restructuring
    Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 4/26/2016
    Like Us on Facebook
    Twitter Feed
    BETWEEN THE CEOs - Executive Interviews
    In this latest installment of the CEO Chat series, Craig Labovitz, co-founder and CEO of Deepfield, sits down with Light Reading's Steve Saunders in Light Reading's New York City office to discuss how Deepfield fits in with the big data trend and more.
    Grant van Rooyen, president and CEO of Cologix, sits down with Steve Saunders, founder and CEO of Light Reading, in the vendor's New Jersey facility to offer an inside look at the company's success story and discuss the importance of security in the telecom industry.
    Animals with Phones
    Live Digital Audio

    Of all the tech companies in the Valley, Intel has made the most aggressive commitment to building a diverse and inclusive workplace culture. It's doing so by taking concrete, measurable steps, making a large financial investment and through a commitment to complete transparency about its progress. In this radio show, WiC Director Sarah Thomas will be joined by Shlomit Weiss, Intel's Vice President, Data Center Group, and General Manager of Networking Engineering, who will share with us why Intel is tackling this huge challenge, how and to what effect. She will also discuss her unique experiences leading development of Client SOC development in the past and today leading development of all of the chipmaker's silicon hardware for networking IPs and discrete devices and managing a team of 600 engineers across Israel, Europe and the US.