& cplSiteName &

Qualcomm Buys HP Mobile Patents

Dan Jones
1/23/2014
50%
50%

Qualcomm revealed Thursday afternoon that it is buying a raft of mobile operating system patents from Hewlett-Packard. The price was not disclosed.

The portfolio includes 2,400 current and pending patents that cover some "core" mobile operating system technologies that HP acquired through its acquisitions of Palm, IPAQ, and Bitfone. Qualcomm Inc. (Nasdaq: QCOM) said in a press release that the IPR trove, which includes 1,400 US patents, gives it more strength and diversity in its mobile patent portfolio. (See Palm Plots Beyond Phones.)

Qualcomm has always been seen as interested in Palm's patents. In 2011, the chipmaker was cited as a possible buyer for the WebOS business. (See Could Qualcomm Take WebOS? and HP Shuts Down WebOS Device Biz.) However, it is not yet clear exactly what patents Qualcomm will get with the buy from HP Inc. (NYSE: HPQ). In April, Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL) bought $10 million of former Palm smartphone-related patents.

Nonetheless, Qualcomm already has one of the most formidable wireless patent portfolios in the world.

— Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, Light Reading

(7)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
lanbrown
50%
50%
lanbrown,
User Rank: Light Sabre
1/24/2014 | 8:27:33 PM
Re: What for?
Believe it or not, not really.  You also get a better phone out of it as well.  Qualcomm is a licensee of ARM, but they don't actually sell an ARM processor.  They sell an ARM compatible processor.  There are many things that Qualcomm does that have hurt the industry as a whole.

Since I will never own a WP handset, there are plenty of handsets to choose from.

I have dealt with Qualcomm on many fronts and it is the same tactic that is constantly used.

I remember their base stations.  They were set in a redundant pair and all I will say it is that it was not because of *if* one crashes or fails.

The elephant in the room; when is Qualcomm not being investigated?

Have you noticed that the last *G standard that Qualcomm did was 3G and their 4G offering was passed by the industry like a panhandler on the corner?  They didn't even make eye contact.  5G looks to be the same way.  The major players have learned from their dealings with Qualcomm.

Can Qualcomm make a living out of just selling chips or will the bottom of the market fall out of it and make it a true commodity item?
DanJones
50%
50%
DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
1/24/2014 | 6:49:32 PM
Re: What for?
" I refuse to buy any phone with any Qualcomm components in it"

Woah, that's got to make device buying somewhat tricky.
Sarah Thomas
50%
50%
Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
1/24/2014 | 3:21:24 PM
Re: What for?
They did introduce the Toq smartwatch, but made clear that a smartphone wasn't their end game -- again. 
lanbrown
50%
50%
lanbrown,
User Rank: Light Sabre
1/24/2014 | 1:10:49 PM
Re: What for?
Qualcomm had a phone division in the past; it was sold to Kyocera.  When Qualcomm had it, they had the patents; they sold the chips and the phones.  New entrants into the CDMA market phone it very difficult to compete with a company that held all three positions.  Motorola tried to do their own chips as what Qualcomm wanted for them was very high.  There were many rumors as to the cost of the chip from Qualcomm.  You also had various countries investigating Qualcomm and around that time, the handset division was sold.  They also sold the base station business as they had that as well.  All in all, many vendors were a partner and a competitor with Qualcomm.  IMO, there is a reason why Qualcomm has faced many investigations.  I refuse to buy any phone with any Qualcomm components in it.  Their goal is lock-in; look at any of their "software" whereas others offered an open standard, CDMA in general that Qualcomm wanted to control and sell every bit of it, etc.  CDMA was used in UMTS, HSDPA, etc. and Qualcomm refused to lift a single finger to support it but was always there holding their hand out demanding their license fees.  Don't believe me, look and see how much Qualcomm did for true standards, not the Qualcomm standard.
Kruz
50%
50%
Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
1/24/2014 | 12:41:50 PM
Re: What for?
Yes I agree. That's a safer approach and they will stay in their comfort zone earning quick cash from licensing.
DanJones
50%
50%
DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
1/24/2014 | 12:03:20 PM
Re: What for?
Just more elements for them to license is my guess.
Kruz
0%
100%
Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
1/24/2014 | 1:54:10 AM
What for?
Will Qualcom produce a phone on its own? Or will it simply use the patents and charge for licensing?
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading is spending much of this year digging into the details of how automation technology will impact the comms market, but let's take a moment to also look at how automation is set to overturn the current world order by the middle of the century.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
March 20-22, 2018, Denver Marriott Tech Center
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
SmartNICs aren't just about achieving scale. They also have a major impact in reducing CAPEX and OPEX requirements.
Hot Topics
Nokia Bell Labs & Verizon Stretch Fixed 5G to the Home
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 11/13/2017
Juniper's New Contrail VP Hails From Google
Craig Matsumoto, Editor-in-Chief, Light Reading, 11/15/2017
Eurobites: Telefónica Reckons Plastic Is Fantastic for FTTH
Paul Rainford, Assistant Editor, Europe, 11/15/2017
Animals with Phones
Why Cats Don't Run Tech Support Click Here
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
The Mobile Broadband Road Ahead
By Kevin Taylor, for Huawei
All Partner Perspectives