& cplSiteName &

Verizon Worried About SDN, NFV Impacts

Sarah Thomas
6/10/2014
100%
0%

ORLANDO, Fla. -- Genband Perspectives -- Verizon is banking on using SDN and NFV in its network to handle the growth in IP traffic, but at least one executive thinks the company is behind in thinking about the operational impacts of the emerging technologies.

Speaking here on Tuesday, Kyle Malady, SVP of global network operations for Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE: VZ), said that the carrier has a "strong program to leverage SDN and NFV," but he's concerned because he's seen a lot of hype of this kind in the past, such as with IMS. (See Defining SDN & NFV.)

"It's one thing to think about it on paper and another in the field with operational problems," he warned. "We are running behind in my company on thinking about the operational impacts of SDN and FNV on our business."

His main concern is that, in the past, if one of his engineers had a problem with, say, Genband Inc. equipment, it would call Genband. "In an NFV world, I'm not sure what happens," he admitted. "There could be a lot of different maintenance issues and people to talk to in order to fix one box." (See Liability Issues Increase in Virtual World.)

That said, Malady thinks SDN and NFV hold a lot of promise, and Verizon is "banking on it." It is just moving more cautiously than some of its competitors like AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T), which has been more bullish about the potential for the virtualization technologies. (See AT&T Working on Home-Grown SDN Controller for Later in 2014 and AT&T Spotlights Early SDN Efforts.)

— Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, Light Reading

(6)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Kevin Mitchell
50%
50%
Kevin Mitchell,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/11/2014 | 2:52:28 PM
Cloud Means NFV From Single Vendor
This is one of the major drivers we hear for cloud sourcing voice vs rebuilding a voice network (NFV or otherwise). A cloud voice platform consolidates over 10 functional elements into a single elastic, fully managed and horizontally integrated solution. And done so with the all-OPEX, success-based SaaS model.

So that's leveraging NFV but from a single vendor and with a better business model, single point of contact for support and lower risk. Cloud voice platform equals NFV plus NOC, plus operations. And done right, the cloud voice platform gives the service provider an elegant way to manage the voice business, not technology.

MNOs and telcos no longer need to run a voice network to be a voice provider. They should leverage the cloud, bot build one when it comes to voice. Their core focus should be on investing in broadband and mobility networks and applications not rebuilding a network that delivers a commodity service with declining ARPU.

My blogs on the topic:

Delicate Balance: Voice without the Investment

NFV is Necessary but not Sufficient

 
brookseven
50%
50%
brookseven,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/11/2014 | 1:23:51 PM
Re: Choking throats
wanlord,

I think you are a bit optimistic about Systems Vendors ability to control themselves.  My experience over the past 10 years or so that the old multiple vendor thing has devolved into 1 winner and a stalking horse.  Given the margin pressure and lack of differentiation that has been put into the business. The stalking horses slave away trying to get any amount of business and end up with less than they spend in R&D for a given program.

All,

To the main point here, there are two ways to proceed.  Purists would like 100K employee organizations to completely redo themselves to use the new technology.  Most people think that we will have experiments and trials.  I think that the experiments and trials will lead to some potential actual RFPs for actual deployment.  This will be true after there has been some time to consume the output from the experiements.  The challenge is going to be is that nobody is likely to have the exact product requested in that RFP.  On top of that things that actually get deployed won't match the RFP.  

Use case at a time will be how this goes. Took 20 years for ARPANET to become the WWW.  We are now 20 years into that revolution and think how different the prirorities are now.  Why should I think a fundamental shift will take less?

seven
wanlord
50%
50%
wanlord,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/11/2014 | 9:38:06 AM
Re: Choking throats
Except you choke that one throat a little too much and you could sufficate them and then you suffer because all your eggs are in one basket.  While not always the best to have multiple vendors which create more maintenance and operational issues, it's better to have them competing against each other to improve their products and reduce costs. Keeping Vendor X on their toes knowing they can be swapped out fairly quickly with Vendor Y who is already embedded in the network. 
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
6/10/2014 | 11:44:18 PM
Choking throats
Cultural changes with SDN and NFV are more important than technology.

When multiple vendors provide a solution, you can get into fingerpointing when something goes wrong. With a single-vendor solution you have one throat to choke.
DHagar
100%
0%
DHagar,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/10/2014 | 10:22:57 PM
Re: Implementation
@danielcawrey, good points. I think, however, that it appears that Verizon may not be fully recognizing the differences, which will truly slow down their understanding of the new.  You first have to know what you don't know and then learn about it.

I think that has been the problem with much of new technology, the tendency is there to just think of a new application, rather than learning and understanding the technology and how it is different.

 
danielcawrey
50%
50%
danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/10/2014 | 7:24:20 PM
Implementation
It seems like this is a common problem with any new technology. How do you plan for something that has not yet been implemented? If you don't understand the specifica consequences of things, it can be difficult to put them into any sort of context. 

The future for SDN and NFV is inevitable. But its realization may be further off than many may think. 
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading is spending much of this year digging into the details of how automation technology will impact the comms market, but let's take a moment to also look at how automation is set to overturn the current world order by the middle of the century.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
November 1, 2017, The Royal Garden Hotel
November 1, 2017, The Montcalm Marble Arch
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue, London, UK
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue London
November 10, 2017, The Westin Times Square, New York, NY
November 16, 2017, ExCel Centre, London
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
With the mobile ecosystem becoming increasingly vulnerable to security threats, AdaptiveMobile has laid out some of the key considerations for the wireless community.
Hot Topics
Muni Policies Stymie Edge Computing
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/17/2017
Is US Lurching Back to Monopoly Status?
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
Pai's FCC Raises Alarms at Competitive Carriers
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
'Brutal' Automation & the Looming Workforce Cull
Iain Morris, News Editor, 10/18/2017
Worried About Bandwidth for 4K? Here Comes 8K!
Aditya Kishore, Practice Leader, Video Transformation, Telco Transformation, 10/17/2017
Animals with Phones
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
The Mobile Broadband Road Ahead
By Kevin Taylor, for Huawei
All Partner Perspectives