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DoCoMo's 2020 Vision for 5G

Dan Jones
4/24/2014
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The CTO of NTT DoCoMo doesn't exactly know what will constitute 5G technology, but he has some wants and expectations of the next generation of wireless communications.

Light Reading spoke to Siezo Onoe, CTO of NTT DoCoMo Inc. (NYSE: DCM), and Lauri Oksanen, vice president of research and technology at Nokia Networks , at the Brooklyn 5G Summit at the NYU campus in downtown Brooklyn on Thursday about the future. Both men made it clear that there is still a lot of work to do in defining the fifth generation of wireless (5G). But they also pointed out some aspects that they do expect to be incorporated into the specification.

Onoe is definitely expecting to use millimeter wave radios, which run at much higher frequencies than traditional cellular radios, as part of any 5G deployment. This is in part because operators expect to have to go up in frequency just to access enough spectrum to support new deployments.

Initial trails have seen vendors using very dense antenna arrays to combat the propagation range and other issues seen in the bands at 28 GHz and above. (See Samsung: Inching Toward 5G?)

"Early tests have shown that it is possible to build a [millimeter wave] small cell network with the nodes roughly 100 meters apart," Oksanen said.

But building a network that dense could cause fiber shortages even for NTT DoCoMo, which typically has good access to optical fiber. "If we deployed that many small cells, we may have some problems, even in Japan," Onoe says.

Thus, both men expect some specification for radio backhaul capabilities to be part of the 5G specification.

Onoe also plans to use lower-band spectrum in 5G just to get coverage in more rural areas. Thus, the trend toward multi-frequency network support is likely to be part of 5G, too.

Onoe hopes that machine-to-machine (M2M) communications will be a big part of any new specification. He says he would like to be able to support "very-low-power" requirements for connections, so that he can run tiny "sensors" that can have a "long battery life" on the network for everything from agricultural to medical applications.

Oksanen expects M2M support to be "built into the specification."

Onoe is targeting 2020 as the likely launch date for 5G. "Probably two years before the launch, we have to start some system tests." NSN's Oksanen says that initial lab tests of some aspects of the technology are going on now.

— Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, Light Reading

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Kruz
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Kruz,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2014 | 10:26:42 AM
Re: How fast?
These guys are always on another galaxy. I was amazed to see the translating glasses they showcased. I hope they drive the industry into a quicker adoption of higher speed internet with the 5G.
DanJones
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DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
4/28/2014 | 12:22:32 PM
Re: How fast?
Sometime in the 2020s probably, DoCoMo still tends to be ahead of most other operators w/ getting to the next G.
Mitch Wagner
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Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/28/2014 | 12:07:21 PM
Re: How fast?
Ah, yes. I should have thought of that. Still an important issue, though perhaps less so what with technology being developed for powering devices from ambient energy (heat, solar, etc.). 
Mitch Wagner
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Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/28/2014 | 12:06:17 PM
Re: How fast?
Nice! I wonder when we can expect to see that technology in the US?
DanJones
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DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
4/28/2014 | 11:32:41 AM
Re: How fast?
Up above a gig downlink probability is up to multi-gig connections, 100X capacity.
DanJones
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DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
4/28/2014 | 11:28:49 AM
Re: How fast?
Battery life concerns are more about tiny devices like sensors though.
DanJonesLRMobile
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DanJonesLRMobile,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/28/2014 | 11:26:58 AM
Re: How fast?
Lots of vendors and industry groups working towards their idea of a 5G spec, no official spec has been defined though, just the expectation that there will be a spec that operators can use as a 2020+ template at some point.
Mitch Wagner
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Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
4/28/2014 | 12:08:04 AM
Re: How fast?
Battery life is particularly useful; it's a sore point for users. Current phone batteries run down too darn fast. 
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/27/2014 | 11:50:36 PM
Re: How fast?
IMHO 5G is not about speeds. It's about use cases that are relevant and pertinent to individuals and businesses. Somehow I had this impression that 5G was already in lab trials. I am surprised that it's still in the specification and standardization stage. Or am I missing something here?
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/26/2014 | 6:24:00 AM
Re: DoCoMo's 2020 Vision for 5G
With some of the technological incorporations expected for the next generation wireless communication of  a 5G network, the question, "how fast will it be?" is brought to our attention. Some of these incorporations include the lower band spectrum to extend coverage to rural areas and machine to machine communications to create an opportunity from very low power requirements for the connection-tiny sensors that have long battery life will be used for the connection, from agricultural to the medical settings. However, there is still a lot of uncertainty and a lot of explanation to be done in defining this fifth generation wireless network as made clear by CTO of NTT Docomo Inc and Lauri Oksanen, the vice president of research and technology ant Nokia Solutions and Networks. The incorporations are just assumptions and are yet to be tested; therefore no certain conclusion can be made yet.
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