Light Reading

Microsoft's Elop Denies He Was a Trojan Horse

Sarah Thomas
4/28/2014
50%
50%

Microsoft's new Head of Devices Stephen Elop is a pilot, a world traveler, and a "cool" guy who enjoys prosciutto ham, mushrooms, green peppers, and tomatoes on his pizza, but he's no Trojan horse.

The Trojan horse bit is a charge the former CEO of Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK) has had to defend since he left Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) to take the reins at the handset maker, committed it to his former employer's operating system, and later facilitated the sale of Nokia back to the mothership. He was able to tie everything up quite nicely with a ribbon and $25 million paycheck, so the question about his equine reputation on today's Q&A live chat session with the Microsoft exec seems justified. (See Microsoft Officially Closes Nokia Buy, Will Elop Return Without the Crown?, The Nokia/Microsoft Conspiracy Theory, and Nokia Adds Another Microsoft Vet.)

Commenter Vivi said (and you have to go with the flow on this one): "You have bashed very harshly with your efforts to take Nokia to Microsoft, have been awarded as Trojan in online discussions and comments. Do you take any effect of all this on your work/decision?"

Elop responded that what remains of Nokia has been transformed into a stronger company with Nokia Networks , HERE, and Advanced Technologies and that the device business has a new opportunity within a stronger Microsoft. (See Euronews: Suri Slated for Nokia Top Job.)

"As for the Trojan horse thing, I have only ever worked on behalf of and for the benefit of Nokia shareholders while at Nokia," he wrote. "Additionally, all fundamental business and strategy decisions were made with the support and approval of the Nokia board of directors, of which I was a member."

Trojan horse? Nay! It's all Greek to me, says Microsoft's Stephen Elop (inset). Sort of.
Trojan horse? Nay! It's all Greek to me, says Microsoft's Stephen Elop (inset). Sort of.

Elop didn't have to defend himself for much of the rest of the Q&A -- besides the one guy who told him "you're so cool" and reminded him how he "buried" Meego, Symbian, and Meltemi -- but he did field (and defer) questions on the future of the Nokia name. (See Nokia Unveils Major Revamp.)

The devices boss said:

    Now that we are One company, the marketing and product folks will lay in the plans for the shift to a consistent brand. While we are not ready to share precise details, I can assure you that it will not be the "Nokia Lumia 1020 with Windows Phone on the AT&T LTE Network" ... too many words! That somehow doesn't roll off the tongue...

Even so, Nokia's future under Microsoft is already starting to take shape. The company put out its first commercial post close, in which it borrows a theme from Samsung Corp. in calling out other smartphone users for being bland and unoriginal. Elop pointed to this spot when someone on the Q&A asked if the bright colors associated with Nokia would make its way into Microsoft's typically conservative design aesthetic. "I'm pretty sure you will see this 'colorful' personality transcend into MSFT," he said.

As for what else will live on from Nokia under Microsoft, that remains to be seen. A leaked letter suggested the name would be changed to "Microsoft Mobile," but Finnish Light Reading community member Susan Fourtané tells us that "Nokia employees I know, who work in Finland and The UK and have been transferred after the deal was closed, have said this week that the company's name is still Nokia, adding 'the same, but different.'"

"Same, but different" is a good way to describe it. The market dynamics are much different from when Nokia was the industry leader: competition is different; consumer demands are different. Elop is the same, of course, but he'll have to understand that things can't stay the same under Microsoft if it's to have a chance at competing again.

— Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, Light Reading

(62)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Page 1 / 7   >   >>
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/12/2014 | 5:02:02 PM
Re: Real scandal
Valar cumulus.
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
5/12/2014 | 4:55:42 PM
Re: Real scandal
Businesses are afraid of being burned by cloud providers who prove unreliable, leading to outages in core business systems. 

I'm coming up blank on DOWNTON ABBEY references. It's GAME OF THRONES/MAD MEN time here. 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/11/2014 | 4:45:09 AM
Re: Real scandal
Of course, in this case, they're afraid of being burned from...what?  From asking the servants to make tea for them?  (I'm feeling very Downton Abbey-ish in my analogies right now.)
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
5/10/2014 | 3:32:14 PM
Re: Real scandal
Some lessons are only learned by businesses after they've been burned. 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/8/2014 | 4:47:19 PM
Re: Real scandal
You're absolutely right.  It still amazes me how un-savvy, tech-wise, companies' legal departments can be about the cloud.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/8/2014 | 4:46:03 PM
Re: Real scandal
*> Day-old sushi*

Well, you just said it, Mitch.  It's the timing!  Gotta get it while it's fresh!  ;)
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
5/8/2014 | 4:30:01 PM
Re: Real scandal
Joe Stanganelli - @Mitch: Regarding going "all-cloud" with dumb clients, this is an idea that's been floated since the '90s, with the argument that Network Computers [NCs] would soon fast replace PCs.

Of course, NCs flopped...but now we are seeing more and more cloud-reliant technology.

Absolutely. The Web browser is the NC. 

My dad has a saying: "There are no bad ideas -- just bad timing."


Oh, I don't know about that. Day-old sushi is always going to be a bad idea for a business. 
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
5/8/2014 | 4:28:13 PM
Re: Real scandal
Joe Stanganelli - "the argument that is more successfully being made these days is that many cloud providers do security much better than their clients -- so why not outsource as a matter of security?"

And it's a valid argument. The key for business is to have service contracts in place that force the cloud provider to pay stiff penalties for breaches or for making data unavailable. 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/8/2014 | 8:32:27 AM
Re: Real scandal
@Mitch: Regarding going "all-cloud" with dumb clients, this is an idea that's been floated since the '90s, with the argument that Network Computers [NCs] would soon fast replace PCs.

Of course, NCs flopped...but now we are seeing more and more cloud-reliant technology.

My dad has a saying: "There are no bad ideas -- just bad timing."
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/8/2014 | 8:31:11 AM
Re: Real scandal
@Mitch: I very much agree with you, but the argument that is more successfully being made these days is that many cloud providers do security much better than their clients -- so why not outsource as a matter of security?

Another interesting notion that was floated at a conference I recently attended: If you trusts your data to one particular cloud provider, and there's a data leak, you know where it came from.
Page 1 / 7   >   >>
More Blogs from Que Sera Sarah
Mosaik's latest US maps paint a picture of where wireless operators have strong low-band spectrum footprints and where there's still a long way to go.
The founder of the GIG and the first female salesperson at Sony shares her advice on carving your own path, being bold and creating a gender intelligent company.
Join us in Dallas as we discuss how to build a positive company culture at Light Reading's next Women in Comms breakfast on Sept. 16 ahead of NFV Everywhere.
As president of Partner Solutions for AT&T, McCorcle has helped transform how the organization works with enterprises, but also how it advocates for women in the industry.
Streaming video company says both new moms and dad can take unlimited parental leave, up to one year, without sacrificing pay.
From The Founder
Against the odds, Huawei is growing its telecoms networking equipment business in the US -- that should be ringing some alarm bells for domestic vendors.
Flash Poll
Live Streaming Video
CLOUD / MANAGED SERVICES: Prepping Ethernet for the Cloud
Moderator: Ray LeMaistre Panelists: Jeremy Bye, Leonard Sheahan
Between the CEOs
Metaswitch's New CEO Martin Lund Discusses His Role

9|2|15   |   11:27   |   (1) comment


Technology industry veteran Martin Lund joins Metaswitch Networks this week as the company's new CEO. In this interview, Lund discusses his new role and the industry's progress with Light Reading CEO Steve Saunders. Lund believes that the industry disruption caused by SDN and NFV is creating opportunities for companies like Metaswitch – network software providers ...
Telecom Innovators Video Showcase
Nominum on Leveraging the Power of DNS to Deliver Superior Subscriber Experiences

9|2|15   |   07:13   |   (0) comments


Nominum CEO Gary Messiana talks about the challenges service providers face in competing for a much more sophisticated customer, a customer that has heightened expectations for more personalized and compelling digital experiences. Providers are focusing their efforts on delivering higher value subscriber services, retaining their existing customers and increasing ...
Between the CEOs
CEO Chat With Jeff Miller, ActiveVideo

8|28|15   |   19:05   |   (0) comments


Jeff Miller, President and CEO of ActiveVideo, talks to Light Reading founder and CEO Steve Saunders about the impact of virtualization on the TV and video distribution market.
LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
Vodafone: Mobile Money Is About Customer Trust

8|27|15   |   06.36   |   (0) comments


Light Reading spoke with Vodafone's Ian Ravenscroft about the unique responsibilities and opportunities facing operators handling customers' financial transactions over the network.
Telecom Innovators Video Showcase
Palo Alto Networks on Expanding in the Carrier/Service Provider Market

8|26|15   |   07:54   |   (0) comments


Alfred Lee from Palo Alto Networks tells Steve Saunders about their new chassis-based system, the PA-7080, and how it can benefit service providers compared to legacy firewalls.
LRTV Custom TV
Global Services Forum Preview

8|25|15   |   02:36   |   (0) comments


Light Reading's CEO and Founder Steve Saunders talks about Huawei's upcoming Global Services Forum with the help of Heavy Reading's Patrick Donegan and Teresa Mastrangelo.
Telecom Innovators Video Showcase
Infoblox on DNS Threat Index

8|19|15   |   04:39   |   (0) comments


Dilip Pillaipakam from Infoblox talks to Steve Saunders about his company's core network services.
Between the CEOs
CEO Chat With Ihab Tarazi, Equinix

8|14|15   |   20:18   |   (1) comment


Equinix CTO Ihab Tarazi talks to Light Reading founder and CEO Steve Saunders about the dramatic changes in the data center, cloud and interconnect markets and discusses the impact of SDN and NFV in the coming years.
Telecom Innovators Video Showcase
The Netformx Ecosystem

8|14|15   |   09:39   |   (1) comment


Ittai Bareket, CEO of Netformx, talks with Steve Saunders about the Netformx Ecosystem, which employs cutting-edge prescriptive analytics to help solution providers maximize profits.
Telecom Innovators Video Showcase
Versa Networks on Leveraging VNFs

8|12|15   |   07:37   |   (0) comments


Kumar Mehta, founder and CEO of stealth mode startup Versa Networks, talks with Steve Saunders about how providers can best leverage virtualized network functions (VNFs).
LRTV Custom TV
Transforming the Network Through OPNFV

8|5|15   |   7:09   |   (0) comments


Sandra Rivera, VP Data Center Group; GM Network Platforms Group, Intel Corporation, on OPNFV Arno and how the industry is coming together to accelerate the deployment of NFV and transform the network.
LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
Huawei ONS Product Demo

8|3|15   |   6:01   |   (0) comments


Huawei shows at Open Networking Summit 2015 in Santa Clara how its SDN and NFV solutions embrace openness.
Upcoming Live Events
September 16-17, 2015, The Westin Galleria Dallas, Dallas, TX
September 16, 2015, The Westin Galleria Dallas, Dallas, TX
September 16, 2015, The Westin Galleria Dallas, Dallas, TX
September 29-30, 2015, The Westin Grand Müchen, Munich, Germany
October 14-15, 2015, New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA
November 5, 2015, Hilton Santa Clara, Santa Clara, CA
November 17, 2015, Santa Clara, California
December 1, 2015, The Westin Times Square, New York City
December 2, 2015, The Westin Times Square, New York City
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
Cisco's cloud and virtualization portfolio can increase business agility and innovation by building a more flexible network architecture.
Hot Topics
T-Mobile CEO Plays Data Traffic Cop
Sarah Thomas, Editorial Operations Director, 8/31/2015
CEO Chat With Bill Gates
Steve Saunders, CEO and founder, Light Reading, 8/31/2015
Time to Monetize Cable WiFi
Alan Breznick, Cable/Video Practice Leader, 8/31/2015
New Apple TV: More $$, Not Content – Report
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 8/31/2015
Ex-AlcaLu Boss Tasked With Bolstering Altice
Iain Morris, News Editor, 9/1/2015
Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
September 16, 2015
Wi-Fi First or Second?
September 22, 2015
Media Begins With “Me”
Webinar Archive
BETWEEN THE CEOs - Executive Interviews
Technology industry veteran Martin Lund joins Metaswitch Networks this week as the company's new CEO. In this interview, Lund discusses his new role and the industry's progress with Light Reading CEO Steve Saunders. Lund believes that the industry disruption caused by SDN and NFV is creating opportunities for companies like Metaswitch – network software providers with the agility to embrace new technologies quickly and the ability to deliver on substantial projects for global network operators.
The scene: Last Saturday, lunchtime, the interior of a shi-shi-foo-foo eatery in Manhattan's SoHo district.
Cats with Phones
Tastes Like Fish Click Here
Please hold while I lick the phone.