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Sprint Unveils $60 Unlimited Plan

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Light Reading
8/21/2014
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OVERLAND PARK, Kan. -- It's a new day for unlimited data in the wireless industry as Sprint (NYSE: S) announces the best unlimited wireless plan available from a national carrier with the Sprint $60 Unlimited Plan. This plan provides consumers unlimited talk, text and data while on America’s Newest Network for just $60 per month, a $20 savings compared to T-Mobile's $80 per month unlimited plan. Simple, easy, affordable – the Sprint $60 Unlimited Plan is available to both new and existing Sprint customers starting tomorrow, August 22. To qualify for the plan, customers must purchase their device through Sprint Easy Pay, pay full retail price or bring their own compatible device.

Whether communicating via email or text, socializing via picture-sharing or tweeting, or navigating with GPS, consumers rely on their smartphones for all of their daily needs. Last year U.S. wireless consumers devoured 3.23 trillion MB of data, according to CTIA’s annual survey1, which equates to watching more than 153 billion five minute cat videos on YouTube, or streaming more than 53.8 billion hours of music on Spotify. Meanwhile, millions of American consumers restrict their usage, fearful of data limits with overage charges. With the Sprint $60 Unlimited Plan, consumers no longer have to worry about high bills based on how much data they are using. Enjoying daily life with the unlimited support of a smartphone has never been so easy.

“People know Sprint for Unlimited,” said Marcelo Claure, Sprint CEO. “We have long been the leader in offering customers unlimited data and that leadership continues today with our new $60 unlimited plan. Unlimited talk, text and data for $60 is the best unlimited postpaid plan available. And, we’ve listened to our loyal customers; we’re making the Sprint $60 Unlimited Plan available to both new and existing customers.”

Sprint Corp. (NYSE: S)

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/3/2014 | 4:26:44 PM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
@KBode: Yes, that matches what I have heard about those carriers -- but regardless, it's still a marketing/PR problem.

For starters, therefore, Sprint really needs to attack the markets in which its network is strong.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
10/2/2014 | 12:08:55 AM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
@briandnewby: I'm still waiting for Nextel-like "push-to-see" video cellphones.  We're already really close on the technology anyway between Enterprise 2.0 videoconferencing solutions and phone apps like Facetime.
KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/29/2014 | 9:51:30 AM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
"Right now, the narrative among consumers is endless kvetching about how awful AT&T and Verizon are...but why are they kvetching so?  Why are they still sticking with AT&T and Verizon, even when their contracts are up?

Because the perception is that those two megacarriers provide the best product -- despite at-times frustrating customer service.

Sprint needs to change the market-wide narrative from how awful those two guys are to how great Sprint is."

Network coverage still of course dictates this. I've tried all four and while I find AT&T and Verizon still have gaps (even in high traffic areas around NYC), T-Mobile and Sprint continue to be substantially worse. I travel and tether a lot for work so I can't have connectivity cutting out constantly...
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/27/2014 | 6:31:02 PM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
That's the thing! Walkie-talkies have their place (cruise ships, for instance). The idea that push-to-talk is this proprietary technology is just nutty. Sometimes, the best way to get ahold of the facilities technician outside IS to call him.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/21/2014 | 6:49:32 PM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
@briandnewby: Indeed, I once worked for a small business where the senior execs were all about the Nextel push-to-talk.

It wasn't exactly a big building.  They probably could have saved tons of money if they had just got cheap cell phones -- and walkie-talkies from Radio Shack.
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/16/2014 | 1:18:42 PM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
It's always been a device-driven marketing proposition.  I think the smartest thing (or dumbest thing) would be to go all Blackberry and have devices unique to the network.  They don't really work network to network anyway.

Nextel's push-to-talk seemed that way, but really, Nextel was superior at targeting small businesses and government offices.  That's another way--own a market segment (and it can be done without a trendy device).
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/11/2014 | 8:46:06 AM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
Not to mention that being excessively cooperative with surveillance plans helped ingratiate the megacarriers to the same government that regulates them.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/11/2014 | 8:44:20 AM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
@brian: Indeed, the two problems are 1) it's become a market of commodities, and it's hard to market YOUR brand of paper clips, and 2) it's become what Scott Adams dubs a "confusopoly" -- where consumers are so confused about the differences in a market where the product is pretty much the same that all players are guaranteed at least *some* healthy slice of the pie.

But for Sprint to overcome the two heavyweights?  They need that Godinesque "Free Prize."  They already offer unlimited data...but that's not enough.

I'm not sure what the solution is, but I think it has to be something totally unheard of.
mhhf1ve
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mhhf1ve,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/5/2014 | 1:48:42 PM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
I'd have to say.. it's not just perception that the two megacarriers provide a better product. If you look at coverage, Verizon and AT&T are objectively better. And I've heard that Tmobile's spectrum isn't as good at penetrating walls, so indoor coverage can be spotty.

Monopolies grant certain advantages... and it's hard for upstarts to actually disrupt when billions of dollars of infrastructure investment is needed to compete.

Maybe if cell tower drones were approved by the FAA, then we'd have some competition b/c it'd be cheaper to fly drones where wireless coverage was needed.... 
briandnewby
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briandnewby,
User Rank: Light Sabre
9/4/2014 | 9:55:44 AM
Re: Not quite the deal it seems for Sprint customers
Joe, true.  And, if wireless is a commodity, then it's harder to differentiate.  Technically, they all have the same phones and the same service (wireless--not going deeper on quality, just saying any of these companies sell, say, an iPhone and voice/data).  I'm not even buying the T-Mobile's positioning is good or sustainable, but there has to be a way to position Sprint.  More so, maybe positioning to the base should be different than to prospects.  If I have Sprint, why should I stay?  It probably/might be/should be a different reason than why I would switch to Sprint.

In the end, though, if disruption is what is needed, then disrupt.  Sprint's plan is like someone clearing his throat for attention in a crowded room of loud talkers.
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