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Curiousfellow
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Curiousfellow,
User Rank: Lightning
12/23/2015 | 10:42:30 AM
How did we get here?
Thanks for asking the question.

Some questions are easy to ask, but hard if not impossible to get answered.

I think the larger question is: what is the basis for the selection of the existing management team, not just the new CEO.

Each of these companies, made a long string of decisions that led them to be the also-rans in the industry. One has to assume that the new owners believe they can bring some fresh management and efficiencies to the new combination to make things profitable. Later doing an IPO or liquidation to earn a return on investment.

Each of the companies in the new entity, for whatever the reasons are, failed to demonstrate viability as stand alone entities in their business sector, which begs the question.......what's different this time?

In the case of Tellabs, the company made a decision to narrow their product lines and business model from addressing the needs of a broad swath of Telecom and DataCom customers, (public, private and government), by offering hundreds of different products and competing in many product categories, and many channels of distribution to focusing exclusively on offering Synchronous Optical Network SONET products to the Bell Operating Companies (the big 5 or 6) and the long haul carriers who had already begun the move to DWDM. In pursuit of this goal, the management at all levels marched in lock step.

The consistent string of acquisitions succeeded mainly in vaporizing hundreds of millions of dollars of cash, the notable exception was a Finish Company; the author and manager of the acquisition was displaced by a new hire with zero product knowledge, after the deal was wildly successful. This was no blip.

Tellabs succeeded in their single minded goal of focusing on SONET, Cross Connects, and just Telcos leading to the crash and burn of the company. One has to wonder, how many of the managers are still manning the key decision making positions?

Reading the 1998 NYT article on the failed Ciena Merger, it may be interesting to do a retrospective article on where are they now. Ciena looks like they will finish 2015 at $2.5B in revenue with greatly expanded product lines from their 1998 business model.

 

Ray@LR
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Ray@LR,
User Rank: Blogger
10/5/2015 | 10:50:32 AM
People, money and technology
There are three main things that influence what goes on in this industry -- people, money and technology -- and the people part of it is sometimes underplayed.



I'm not sure that Kheradpir had the optimum team supporting him during his time at Juniper and he did, in fairness, walk straight into an activist investor maelstrom. 

But... he now carries a reputation in the communications networking industry as the guy who crashed and burned at Juniper. Let's see if eh can tuirn that reputation around.


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