& cplSiteName &
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
redface
50%
50%
redface,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:07:07 AM
re: UCLA Claims First Silicon Laser
This seems to be an impressive achievement if it can be made practical.

I would like to know what is the lasing mechanism. How does the laser get its gain? Is it based on electrical pumping of power, or does it depend on optical pumping (in which case it probably would not be considered a true "silicon laser").
deauxfaux
50%
50%
deauxfaux,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:07:06 AM
re: UCLA Claims First Silicon Laser
It is a Raman laser.....the real question is

"Where is the pump"

The answer: It ain't Silicon yet
deauxfaux
50%
50%
deauxfaux,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:07:05 AM
re: UCLA Claims First Silicon Laser
Redface

I am going to check into the details to be 100% certain on this point, if anything different comes out of my investigation, I'll track you down on one of the boards and correct my post.
But I am 99% sure.

Yes....hypesmanship. Jalali was able to hype one other company into acquisition by Intel (Cognet, I think), so none of this seems surprising.

Deaux
redface
50%
50%
redface,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:07:05 AM
re: UCLA Claims First Silicon Laser
Deaufaux wrote:
"Where is the pump"
The answer: It ain't Silicon yet.

Thanks for the answer. So this is not really a "silicon laser". Rather, it is some kind of nonlinear optics done in silicon waveguides. It is really disturbing when people refuses to call a horse's ass a horse's ass...

I believe Intel is working on a similar device based on Raman amplification in silicon.

deauxfaux
50%
50%
deauxfaux,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:07:04 AM
re: UCLA Claims First Silicon Laser
Really cool stuff, but unfortunately, optically pumped and commercially irrelevant for the next 5-10 years

http://www.opticsexpress.org/v...
Frank
50%
50%
Frank,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:07:02 AM
re: UCLA Claims First Silicon Laser
Silicon optics switches by changing refractive index

By R. Colin Johnson
EE Times
October 27, 2004 (6:04 PM EDT)

PORTLAND, Ore. G Silicon circuits traditionally don't do optics. As anc"indirect bandgap" material G one in which the bottom of the conduction band is shifted with respect to the top of the valence band G energy released during electron recombination with a hole is converted primarily into phonons instead of the photons. The result is a "direct bandgap" material like gallium arsenide.

Cornell University researchers have demonstrated nanoscale techniques they say enabled the world's first silicon chip that switches optical wavelengths. The key is a ring-shaped nanoscale cavity whose resonant frequency depends on its refractive index, which can be optically switched by virtue of a second light beam controlling free-carrier dispersion.

According to Cornell University engineer Michal Lipson, the technique should eventually enable terahertz switching of signals on silicon chips with ultra-low power, high-modulation depth picosecond optical switches. They can be fabricated alongside conventional silicon circuitry. "Our photonic circuits are for carrying information, not for logic," said Lipson, principle investigator and an assistant professor at Cornell in its electrical and computer engineering department.

The first application is likey to be all-optical routers rather than not photonic circuitry, which could come later. The National Science Foundation is funding Lipson's quest for techniques to enable silicon to handle optics applications.


Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading is spending much of this year digging into the details of how automation technology will impact the comms market, but let's take a moment to also look at how automation is set to overturn the current world order by the middle of the century.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
March 20-22, 2018, Denver Marriott Tech Center
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
SmartNICs aren't just about achieving scale. They also have a major impact in reducing CAPEX and OPEX requirements.
Hot Topics
Nokia Bell Labs & Verizon Stretch Fixed 5G to the Home
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 11/13/2017
Eurobites: Telefnica Reckons Plastic Is Fantastic for FTTH
Paul Rainford, Assistant Editor, Europe, 11/15/2017
Juniper's New Contrail VP Hails From Google
Craig Matsumoto, Editor-in-Chief, Light Reading, 11/15/2017
Animals with Phones
Why Cats Don't Run Tech Support Click Here
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
The Mobile Broadband Road Ahead
By Kevin Taylor, for Huawei
All Partner Perspectives