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moon_shot
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moon_shot,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:38:19 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


Huawei stole every single IP document from Nortel Networks over a 10 year period, as recently reported globally.  Hmmm.  Sounds like an upstanding and forthright company to me.


 

paolo.franzoi
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paolo.franzoi,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:09 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


 


My take is that we should ban all Chinese engineered products from the comm network in the US.  It is simply too big a hole for security.  If Huawei were willing to create a wall and do all of its development for US sold products in the US, then I would consider buying from them.  An alternative would be that they deliver every schematic and line of source for every version of every product that they build to the NSA.  Once the NSA declares it good, then we can allow it in.


 


seven


 

lowprofile
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lowprofile,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:09 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


The loan given by China Development Bank to Huawei's customers are for buying Huawei's products and services, right? 


China Development Bank is controlled by Chinese government, right?


The customer that gets the loan uses it to pay Huawei, right?


The bank does not provide the same loan to Cisco or Juniper or Brocade customers, right?


---


If the above is correct, then the logical conclusion is Huawei is indeed financially supported by the Chinese government to the extent to $30billion, which is a lot!

keepsimple
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keepsimple,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:09 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


This letter is long overdue. I am wondering if Cisco / Juniper / Motorola are fully restricted in China?


 

Taporirz
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Taporirz,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:09 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


Seven, in that case I suggest you start buying some stamps for postage because its probably the only means of communication that you could use that won't require any product "engineered" in China. We live in a global economy in which an ecosystem exists and development is done across many regions.  Every major viable vendor in the world today has some development in China or atleast some component that is developed in China.  So from your absolute statement the NSA should be very busy verifying everyones code.


General comments like "it is simply too big a hole for security" is an insult to the technical community. 


TaporiRZ

paolo.franzoi
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paolo.franzoi,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:08 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


 


My take is that the NSA has already hacked all Cisco and Juniper products (as well as Alcatel and Erricson routers).  The idea is that they get the Huawei gear so they can hack all the Chinese Government Communications.  


If it were me I would actually ban ALL imports from China and default on the debt owed them, but that is me.  We live in a Global Economy but the US for now is still several times the size of the Chinese Economy.


Engineering is one thing, manufacturing is another.  I said engineering to be specific.  If it is designed in China you should assume that the Chinese Government can use it to hack your networks.  Really think this is a good idea when we are on a collision course with China?


seven


 

pdonegan67
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pdonegan67,
User Rank: Light Sabre
12/5/2012 | 5:12:08 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US




Governments are entitled to their concerns, whatever they may be. Under a democratic system, there is nothing more sacred than a citizen's right to expect that their security will never be knowingly compromised by those they elected.

The interesting question for me is when you have a company like Huawei which is increasingly leading and defining the telecom industry’s future technology roadmap, at what point does a country’s global competitiveness start to be hindered by denying its service providers access to a major technology leader? And at what point does throttling back on competitiveness actually become a greater national security risk than the risk supposedly posed by the presence in the network of a Chinese vendor?

You might argue that Verizon's networks seems to be doing perfectly well in delivering leading wireline and wireless services without Huawei, thank you very much. In wireless, for example, Verizon is the world leader in 4G LTE deployment as well as in ARPU projections, for goodness sake.

But project that five or ten years further out and how competitive will Verizon remain if it only sticks with its current suppliers? Just as importantly, how can Sprint, AT&T and T-Mobile be expected to stay competitive in the interests of American businesses and consumers unless they’re able to have access to all the best network technology?

However legitimate the motivations of the politicians and the spooks, it seems to me that the balance of risk is bound to shift over time.  Last October Heavy Reading published a report looking at the lengths to which the world's largest vendors, most notably Huawei and NSN, are going to demonstrate their security credentials.  http://www.heavyreading.com/details.asp?sku_id=2613&skuitem_itemid=1288&promo_code=&aff_code=&next_url=%2Flist%2Easp%3Fpage%5Ftype%3Dall%5Freports. Interestingly, the only major vendor that refused to contribute to the report was Cisco, citing reasons of, ahem, "security". Go figure. It's a funny thing this security business….




quicktime
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quicktime,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:06 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


Though the fact is not true.


I am curious at of the logic behind the induction.


Think about GM, AIG, GS, MS, BOA, JPM


They are all backed by your tax money directly.


 


Engineering is engineering.  Be rational and be simple.


 


 

JeddChen
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JeddChen,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:06 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


I agree with you.


many major IT/CT vendors, like Ericson, the leading solution provider is now recruiting people in China to develop media network and mobile core network.


check the link: http://topic.csdn.net/u/20110119/10/f8b48d8a-ca8d-43b4-8bee-8a77f08287dd.html.


 


According the point of view of Mr. Seven, this famous European company can sell it solutions to USA? I don't think that Ericson has asked NSA or third party to check all "hole" in its solution. Be careful, it is made in China:-)


Qualcom is also recruiting now on website of www.52rd.com. check the link:


http://www.52rd.com/Tech/Company/?CID=Qualcomm&FID=5&ClassID=Job

paolo.franzoi
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50%
paolo.franzoi,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:12:05 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US



Here is where I come from.  If you project out 10 – 20 years, China will have its entire communication infrastructure built by Chinese Companies by Chinese Engineers.  What that means is that they will be the only country entirely in control of their own communications infrastructure.  I think that this is a great national security move by the Chinese Government.  It will certainly make it much harder for US spy agencies to penetrate them and just as importantly make their infrastructure more immune to external attack.

What I think is misunderstood is that our infrastructure is very important to our day to day lives. Energy, Water, Transportation and Communications are essential for our society to function.  Imagine a day when nobody in the US could make a call, send a text or use the Internet.  I am not sure there would be “panic in the streets” but if it lasted for very long the US economy and our lives would be hurt very badly.

The problem I have with Huawei (and ZTE and any other equivalent) is that having that equipment in our networks make it more likely that we are vulnerable to these attacks.  It is not Huawei’s fault.  I don’t think the people that work there are evil or bad people.  But I am confused on why anybody thinks its a good idea to hand what is an enemy state the keys to cratering your economy.  Just like I would not oursource Tank or Fighter Jet design to a Chinese Arms manufacture, I think it is an awful idea to outsource communications (or energy or transportation or water or <add your favorite infrastructure>) to a country that is not an ally.  

Think about the deal that Alcatel had to make to be allowed to by Lucent.  I am still wary over that whole thing (we just handed away one of the great research assets of the past to a foreign power).  

My views are clearly quite parochial and old fashion realpolitik.  I have not found human behavior to have changed over time, so I don’t believe that the Chinese are happy to be a minor player in the world (that was a modern oddity of history).  They have viewed us as rivals and so I think we need to defend ourselves.  If that means we don’t buy products from Huawei and ZTE then so be it. 




seven


 


PS - http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/s...





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