Light Reading

ITU Approves New 4G Specs

Michelle Donegan
LR Mobile News Analysis
Michelle Donegan
7/23/2008
50%
50%

The International Telecommunication Union, Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) has re-ignited the technology tussle between so-called 4G technologies Long-Term Evolution (LTE) and WiMax by approving the technical requirements for next-generation mobile broadband technology, IMT-Advanced.

With the general specifications now set for IMT-Advanced -– which is ITU-speak for 4G -– candidate technologies can, from October, be submitted to the ITU.

And, as Unstrung has reported, the WiMax camp at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. (IEEE) and the LTE camp at the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) are already prepping their candidates -- 802.16m and LTE-Advanced, respectively -- for the next mobile broadband showdown. (See Wireless Camps Prep Fresh 4G Battle, 3GPP Studies LTE Are Advanced, and Faster WiMax on the Way.)

The technical criteria were approved at a meeting held in Dubai at the end of June. While the ITU-R declined to provide any details of the agreed technical requirements to Unstrung, those details are expected to be published on the IMT-Advanced Website at the end of this week.

Some guidelines are available from industry sources, though. According to Erik Ekudden, vice president and head of standardization and industry initiatives at Ericsson AB (Nasdaq: ERIC), who has been involved in setting the criteria, the requirements include average downlink speeds of 100 Mbit/s in the wide area network, and up to 1 Gbit/s for local access or low mobility scenarios.

Another key criterion for IMT-Advanced is low latency. Specifically, the parameters include less than 10 millisecond roundtrip delay and less than 100 milliseconds to set up a new session.

And IMT-Advanced calls for very wide channel widths. The technology needs 40MHz and preferably up to 100MHz channel allocations, according to Ekudden.

Requirements of that kind are completely new territory for the cellular industry. Never before have such large spectrum allocations been needed. And that means spectrum availability will be a big challenge for IMT-Advanced technologies.

"Regulators have to set aside more continuous spectrum to launch these systems," says Ekudden. "It's up to governments and regulators around the world to allocate this spectrum. The industry challenge is to ensure the new spectrum is made available for IMT-Advanced."

Will WiMax and LTE get together in IMT-Advanced?
IMT-Advanced poses an opportunity for WiMax and LTE to get together. But opinions seem to vary about the likelihood of the two camps burying the hatchet and blending their rival technologies, which actually have much in common. (See WiMax's Long-Term Evolution.)

While Unstrung has reported that the IEEE and 3GPP have considered the prospect of working more closely on IMT-Advanced, others believe the two technologies are set on their own next-generation paths and cannot be combined simply.

"We don't see any trend for putting everything into one bucket, stirring it around and seeing what comes out," says Ekudden. "It's not so easy to technically harmonize. There is strong support for [each] technology as such."

"A lot of good will come out of this big process [for IMT-Advanced]," he adds. "The technical basis for different technology tracks is already established and they are not going to change."

The ITU-R will start accepting proposals for candidate technologies at the next IMT-Advanced meeting in October. At that time, it's understood the ITU-R will also agree on the evaluation criteria for the technologies.

IMT-Advanced technologies will take the cellular systems through the next 10 to 15 years. The ITU-R is expected to complete its recommendation for the IMT-Advanced radio interface technology in early 2011.

— Michelle Donegan, European Editor, Unstrung

(9)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
lrmobile_kumaramitabh
50%
50%
lrmobile_kumaramitabh,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:36:07 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
The ITU recommendations on the IEEE 802.16m or LTE now place this technology in the same position as the WiMAX 802.16e was in 2005.
It will not be before end of 2008, i.e a full three years to have the chipsets developed, technologies tested and spectrum bands finalized.

Een though many vendors claim having demonstrated 4G systems, the true time line begins now. Considering the spectrum requirements, it can be quite a challange.

The only advantage of 4G is that it would be a 3GPP technology and provide an upgrade path from existing mobile 3G+ networks, while using the Mobile WiMAX needs the IMS technologies.

http://www.wimaxbook.net
wap545
50%
50%
wap545,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:36:06 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
"..IMT-Advanced calls for very wide channel widths. The technology needs 40MHz and preferably up to 100MHz channel allocations,.."

Did I read this right??
WHat can Verizon Wireless do with its 20Mhz of 700Mhz spectrum (recent C Block win) if they will need minimum of 40Mhz to obtain an basic LTE 4G Network.
What am I missing here??

Jim
mvakulenko1
50%
50%
mvakulenko1,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:36:04 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
Another requirement that was not mentioned in the article is bandwidth scalability, i.e. ability to use frequency channels of varying width - From, say, 1.25 MHz up to 40 MHz. The data rates will be changing accordingly.

LTE currently scales between 1.25 and 20 MHz and is a good fit for existing spectrum allocations.
lite.reader
50%
50%
lite.reader,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:36:04 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
If 802.16m and LTE-"Advanced" are candidates for "4"G then what would generation would we classify 802.16e and LTE-"Standard"?

Are they just called "pre-4G" or "3G+" or something of that sort?
Michelle Donegan
50%
50%
Michelle Donegan,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:36:04 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
Hi Jim,
The article is about the technologies that come after LTE way down the road. The ITU calls it IMT-Advanced. The two technologies that have emerged as candidates are 802.16m and LTE-Advanced, which are the next generations of today's mobile WiMax and LTE.
It's confusing because the industry has got a bit ahead of itself by referring to WiMax and LTE as 4G, when actually the ITU's IMT-Advanced is technically the real 4G.

Hopefully that makes sense! Thanks for the comment.

Michelle
IPobserver
50%
50%
IPobserver,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:36:03 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
DoCoMo has been calling LTE "Super 3G."

A while back, quite a bit of the industry tried to hold-off using the GÇ£4GGÇ¥ term because of the ITU Advanced process, and because 3G was only just getting into its stride.

4G is widely used in the U.S., especially by Sprint and VZW for mobile WiMax and LTE, and so thatGÇÖs become standard usage. I think thatGÇÖs fair enough GÇô it is a shift to a new generation of radio technology.

Interestingly thou, it doesnGÇÖt necessarily follow that there will be a huge difference in end-user experience between 3G (HSPA or EVDO) and 4G (LTE or WiMax).
wap545
50%
50%
wap545,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:35:49 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
I still have not got the answer to my question.
If I only have 12 or 20Mhz of the 700Mhz spectrum won in the US market and the new and future IMT-Adanced requires 40 and or 100Mhz of spectrum where do these folks get the additional spectrum ?
Missing something fundamental here.
Jim
IPobserver
50%
50%
IPobserver,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:35:49 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
It is a fundamental for the entire industry and is not specific to AT&T and VZW.

If youGÇÖre looking for the potential IMT Advanced bands, there are two charts here that identify candidate bands per WRC 2007.

http://www.unstrung.com/inside...

ThatGÇÖs not to say operators canGÇÖt do LTE in 700 MHz or AWS.
wap545
50%
50%
wap545,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:35:44 PM
re: ITU Approves New 4G Specs
Thanks for the input. Very difficult to find folks that know what they are talking about vs. those spouting vendor propaganda.

Jim A
Educational Resources
sponsor supplied content
Educational Resources Archive
Flash Poll
From The Founder
Last week I dropped in on "Hotlanta," Georgia to moderate Light Reading's inaugural DroneComm conference – a unique colloquium investigating the potential for drone communications to disrupt the world's telecom ecosystem. As you will see, it was a day of exploration and epiphany...
Between the CEOs
Affirmed Networks CEO: Digging Into NFV

5|28|15   |   40:26   |   (2) comments


Hassan Ahmed, CEO of Affirmed Networks, is making some big claims for his NFV startup. I sat down with him at the Light Reading HQ in New York City to get the skinny on what this Acton, Mass.-based startup is up to.
LRTV Documentaries
Cable Eyeing SDN for Headend, Home Uses

5|26|15   |   05:57   |   (1) comment


CableLabs is looking at virtualizing CMTS and CCAP devices in the headend, as well as in-home devices, says CableLabs' Karthik Sundaresan.
LRTV Documentaries
Verizon's Emmons: SDN Key to Cost-Effective Scaling

5|22|15   |   03:53   |   (0) comments


For Verizon and other network operators to ramp up available bandwidth cost effectively, they need to move to SDN and agree on how to do that.
LRTV Documentaries
Lack of Universal SDN a Challenge

5|21|15   |   04:51   |   (3) comments


Heavy Reading Analyst Sterling Perrin talks about how uncertainty about SDN standards and approaches may be slowing deployment.
LRTV Custom TV
Steve Vogelsang Interview: Carrier SDN

5|20|15   |   05:02   |   (0) comments


Sterling Perrin speaks to Steve Vogelsang, Alcatel-Lucent CTO for IP Routing & Transport business, about the new Carrier SDN-enabling Network Services Platform and the operator challenges it solves.
LRTV Custom TV
Carrier SDN: On-Demand Networks for an On-Demand World

5|20|15   |   20:52   |   (0) comments


Steve Vogelsang, Alcatel-Lucent CTO for IP Routing & Transport business, talks about requirements and benefits of Carrier SDN during the keynote address at the Light Reading Carrier SDN event May 2015.
LRTV Documentaries
The Security Challenge of SDN

5|19|15   |   02:52   |   (0) comments


CenturyLink VP James Feger discusses concerns that virtualization could create new vulnerabilities unless network operators build in safeguards.
LRTV Custom TV
NFV Elasticity – Highly Available VNF Scale-Out Architectures for the Mobile Edge

5|18|15   |   5:50   |   (0) comments


Peter Marek and Paul Stevens from Advantech Networks and Communications Group talk about their NFV Elasticity initiative and the company's latest platforms for deploying virtual network functions at the edge of the network. Packetarium XL and the new Versatile Server Module: 'designed to reach parts of the network that other servers cannot reach.'
LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
Bay Area Spark Meetup 2015

5|14|15   |   3:54   |   (0) comments


Developed in 2009, Apache Spark is a powerful open source processing engine built around speed, ease of use and sophisticated analytics. This spring, Huawei hosted a meetup for Spark developers and data scientists in Santa Clara, California. Light Reading spoke with organizers and attendees about Huawei's code contributions and long-term commitment to Spark.
LRTV Custom TV
The Transport SDN Buzz

5|12|15   |   06:01   |   (1) comment


Sterling Perrin, senior analyst at Heavy Reading, speaks with Peter Ashwood-Smith of Huawei and Guru Parulkar of ON.Lab about the evolution of transport SDN and the integration of technologies.
LRTV Custom TV
Next-Generation CCAP: Cisco cBR-8 Evolved CCAP

5|5|15   |   04:49   |   (0) comments


John Chapman, Cisco's CTO of Cable Access Business Unit and Cisco Fellow, explained the innovation design of Cisco's cBR-8, the industry's first Evolved CCAP, including DOCSIS 3.1 design from ground-up, distributed CCAP with Remote PHY and path to virtualization. Cisco's cBR-8 Evolved CCAP is the platform that will last through the transitions.
LRTV Custom TV
Meeting the Demands of Bandwidth & Service Group Growth

5|1|15   |   5:35   |   (0) comments


Jorge Salinger, Comcast's Vice President of Access Architecture, explains how DOCSIS 3.1 and multi-service CCAP can meet the demands of the bandwidth and service group growth.
Upcoming Live Events
June 8, 2015, Chicago, IL
June 9, 2015, Chicago, IL
June 9-10, 2015, Chicago, IL
June 10, 2015, Chicago, IL
September 29-30, 2015, The Westin Grand Müchen, Munich, Germany
October 6, 2015, The Westin Peachtree Plaza, Atlanta, GA
October 6, 2015, Westin Peachtree Plaza, Atlanta, GA
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
Procera has gathered facts, stats and customer experience feedback from a survey of 540 users from across the globe.
Hot Topics
10 Alternate Uses for Tablets
Eryn Leavens, Copy Desk Editor, 5/22/2015
Bidding War for TWC Looks Likelier
Alan Breznick, Cable/Video Practice Leader, 5/22/2015
Charter Seals Deals for TWC, Bright House
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 5/26/2015
Eurobites: Alcatel-Lucent Trials 400G in Czech Republic
Paul Rainford, Assistant Editor, Europe, 5/26/2015
Potholes Lurk in Indian Smart City Project
Gagandeep Kaur, Contributing Editor, 5/22/2015
Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
BETWEEN THE CEOs - Executive Interviews
On May 29th 10 AM ET, Steve Saunders, founder and CEO of Light Reading, will be drilling into the "pains and gains" of NFV with Saar Gillai, SVP & GM for NFV at Hewlett-Packard Co. (NYSE: HPQ) (HP). He has defined a four-step NFV model describing a sequence of technology innovation. It's a must-read doc for any network architect looking to get to grips with their NFV migration strategy. Join us for the interview, and the chance to ask Saar your NFV questions directly!
Hassan Ahmed, CEO of Affirmed Networks, is making some big claims for his NFV startup. I sat down with him at the Light Reading HQ in New York City to get the skinny on what this Acton, Mass.-based startup is up to.
With 200 customers in 60 countries, Stockholm-based Net Insight has carved out a solid leadership position in one of the hottest vertical markets going in comms right now: helping service providers and broadcasters deliver video and other multimedia traffic over IP networks. How has Net Insight managed to achieve this success in the face of immense competition from the industry giants?
Cats with Phones