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Connected Cars: Tether Today, Embed in 10

Sarah Thomas
7/2/2014
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The majority of connected cars on the road today are likely getting online via the driver's smartphone, but embedded connectivity is on track to become a standard feature over the next 10 years.

The ability to allow consumers to tether their smartphones to the car will be the biggest driver of the connected car space over the next 18 months, according to new research from Heavy Reading . However, in a separate report, Analysys Mason suggests that 90% of all new cars will have embedded connectivity by 2024. (See MNOs Need to Get in the Driver's Seat.)

Both reports could certainly be right. The reality is that the connected car space is a hotbed of excitement right now, but connectivity, business models, and app considerations are still being worked out as the industry figures out what consumers want, how they want it, and what they'll pay for.

"For now, built-in options might provide stronger connections, but consumers overall prefer tethering their existing smartphones to cars via Bluetooth or USB cables so they can have full access to their personal contacts and playlists," says Denise Culver, an analyst at Heavy Reading and author of its report.

In Analysys Mason's forecast, 48% of cars in the world will have embedded connectivity by 2024, and 48% of car owners will be able to pair their smartphone with their vehicle's infotainment system. Consumers may begin to expect their in-car experience to align with their out-of-car life, the analyst firm says, meaning they'll want access to all their apps anywhere they go.

That said, Culver says that how manufacturers address the issue of how many apps to introduce is still in flux, as well. They (rightfully) have concerns about security and reliability, so they aren't willing to open their car doors to every app out there. (See Finding the Value in Transportation Telematics, Nokia Pumps $100M into Connected Cars, Apple CarPlay Puts Siri in the Driver's Seat, and Are Connected Cars Creepy or Cool?)

"Most auto manufacturers will want to maintain control over developers, while also limiting the number of apps available in the car," Culver says.

This means that operators will have to be flexible in how they bill for in-car connectivity -- whether it's by app, a data add-on, part of a bucket (for which AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) is angling), or built into the cost of the car. Right now, most are figuring out what business model resonates the most with consumers while working through regulatory and safety concerns. (See AT&T Makes GM Cars a Data Plan Add-On, Volvo: AT&T HSPA+ Can Drive My Car, and AT&T Tests Drivers' Desire to Pay for LTE.)

"User-friendly service packaging and subscription models are attracting growing numbers of consumers to connected car solutions, even as car manufacturers, OEMs and governments develop strategies for how connected cars can improve safety and communication on the roads for the future," Culver concludes in the report.

— Sarah Reedy, Senior Editor, Light Reading

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jabailo
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jabailo,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/2/2014 | 8:09:41 PM
Re: More distracted driving
Conversely could there be an always talking "backseat driver" programs that use the Google Car 360 degree scanner, but pass the information to the driver by voice rather than steering it himself.

Although from what I've seen of Google's technology (they now have videos of a car with no steering wheel and no pedals...100% automatic with no manual override) we're basically...there.

 
kq4ym
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kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/2/2014 | 7:53:37 PM
Re: More distracted driving
Eliminating distracted drivers is certainly going to be a challenge as apps expand in complexity and volume, and drivers get habituated to using devices in cars for more and more tasks. Getting voice control will certainly be a goal, but even then, it's going to take some creativity and study to get it right to allow our eyes and minds to stay focused on driving safely.
jabailo
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jabailo,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/2/2014 | 12:20:01 PM
Re: More distracted driving
I was doing some house hunting yesterday, so I had my Android phone and was trying to use Navigate with Google Voice.   It both worked and didn't.   On a good try I can simply say "Navigate to 1234 56th Street ..." and it will start up sending me voice directions.

However, it's still a bit clunky as I have to click the microphone to start Google Voice.  And some times it immediately starts Navigating me and other times it wants me to press more buttons.

Voice has to be the most under-utilized feature of Android smartphones right now.  I'm astounded at how much I can do with voice commands ("set alarm for 9:30").  And yet few seem to use it.   When I said "World Cup" to my smartphone while at Starbucks recently, so I could get the day's scores, people looked as if I had just landed my saucer in the parking lot.   You mean you never use your phone like this?  I guess not!

That said, I would want nearly all voice command in a driving situation.  (At least until they automate driving...then I'll be reading a tablet while my car drives me.)

 
Phil_Britt
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Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/2/2014 | 11:16:25 AM
More distracted driving
While some aspects of the connected car seem good, especially for emergencies or long trips, there's enough distracted driving today without it. I'm afraid distracted driving and resulting collisions would spike with too much connectivity. Havings streaming audio is one thing, but add video and the Google driverless cars will be the safest on the road.
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