& cplSiteName &

Intel, Others Form Another IoT Alliance

Jason Meyers
7/8/2014
50%
50%

A new consortium ostensibly aimed at defining connectivity and interoperability requirements for the Internet of Things sector is likely to make IoT standardization increasingly convoluted.

The Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC) was formed by Intel Corp. (Nasdaq: INTC), Dell Technologies (Nasdaq: DELL), Broadcom Corp. (Nasdaq: BRCM), Atmel Corp. (Nasdaq: ATML), Samsung Corp. , and Wind River Systems Inc. The group's aim is to create connectivity standards based on open source code to ensure interoperability of connected IoT devices.

Noticeably absent from the ranks of the OIC's founders, however, is Qualcomm Inc. (Nasdaq: QCOM), which backs the 51-member AllSeen Alliance that Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) joined just last week. That group is angling to standardize IoT device interconnection via the AllJoyn language. None of the founding companies in the OIC are members of the AllSeen Alliance. (See Microsoft Joins Qualcomm & Friends in IoT Standards Group.)

Heavy hitters like Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) and Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL), meanwhile, appear to be steering clear of any consortium, presumably content to develop their own IoT connectivity specifications.

The announcement of the OIC's formation offers few details about its specific approach to standards development, but the group's emphasis on openness, collaboration, and choice could be taken as a jab at AllJoyn, which, while now open-source, was a Qualcomm-developed platform. (See Qualcomm Launches AllJoyn Project.)

Other industry groups working to contribute to IoT standardization do have overlapping membership with both OIC and AllSeen, including the Industrial Internet Consortium, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. (IEEE) , and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) . With industry pundits projecting tens of millions of connected devices by 2020, the IoT sector is a hotbed of activity -- one likely to get even hotter (and more chaotic) with the formation of seemingly competing standards organizations.

Jason Meyers, Utility Communications Editor, Light Reading

(4)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
jasonmeyers
50%
50%
jasonmeyers,
User Rank: Blogger
7/9/2014 | 7:57:34 AM
Re: Internet of What Now?
Yes you're right - sorry, missed that. 
cguerineau
50%
50%
cguerineau,
User Rank: Light Beer
7/9/2014 | 6:40:41 AM
Re: Internet of What Now?
I see Cisco as a "Community" member of the Allseen alliance
jasonmeyers
50%
50%
jasonmeyers,
User Rank: Blogger
7/8/2014 | 6:44:26 PM
Re: Internet of What Now?
Cisco is not listed as a member of either the new OIC or the AllSeen Alliance, but it is a member of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), which was founded in May. Intel and Samsung are also members of the IIC.

That group's charter is a bit broader, according to its website: create new application use cases, test beds, and reference architectures; influence the standards deelopment process; facilitate open forums to share concepts; and "build confidence around new and innovative approaches to security."

There sure are a lot of clubs in the IoT ecosystem.
DOShea
50%
50%
DOShea,
User Rank: Blogger
7/8/2014 | 12:18:14 PM
Internet of What Now?
Is Cisco in any of these groups, or will it start its own Internet of Everything group?
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading founder Steve Saunders grills Cisco's Roland Acra on how he's bringing automation to life inside the data center.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
February 26-28, 2018, Santa Clara Convention Center, CA
March 20-22, 2018, Denver Marriott Tech Center
April 4, 2018, The Westin Dallas Downtown, Dallas
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
SmartNICs aren't just about achieving scale. They also have a major impact in reducing CAPEX and OPEX requirements.
Hot Topics
Project AirGig Goes Down to Georgia
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 12/13/2017
Here's Pai in Your Eye
Alan Breznick, Cable/Video Practice Leader, Light Reading, 12/11/2017
Verizon's New Fios TV Is No More
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 12/12/2017
Ericsson & Samsung to Supply Verizon With Fixed 5G Gear
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 12/11/2017
Cloudy With a Chance of Automation: Telecom in 2018
Iain Morris, News Editor, 12/12/2017
Animals with Phones
Don't Fall Asleep on the Job! Click Here
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed