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Intel Wants to Light Up the IoT Market

Dan Jones
6/24/2014
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NEW YORK CITY -- Intel Future Showcase 2014 -- Intel is prepping silicon for launch this summer to try and expand the market for the Internet of Things.

The chipmaker is readying its Edison compute module for launch "within the next couple of months," according to Tom Foldesi, senior director of the new devices group at Intel Corp. (Nasdaq: INTC). The silicon will be aimed at professional device makers and entrepreneurs, rather than amateur builders, as Intel's current Galileo development platform is.

Meet Edison
Intel's latest IoT silicon on a pedestal.
Intel's latest IoT silicon on a pedestal.

Foldesi said that Edison is a 500MHz dual-core, dual-thread chip module using the Atom processor with 1 GB of RAM and 4 GB of eMMC Flash memory on board. WiFi and Bluetooth wireless connectivity is supported on the silicon. The 70-pin onboard connector supports "more than 30" types of I/O connections.

Power consumption is also an important concern for wearables and other types of IoT devices. "It's similar or lower than a mobile device, roughly," he said. Intel hasn't released official stats yet, but consumption will be dependent on applications.

Foldesi expects that devices using the Edison silicon to be available "within the next few quarters." The chip module will compete with ARM Ltd. offerings, as well as the cult Raspberry Pi chip.

Intel is also basing some IoT work on the Galileo development board, which is typically aimed more at hobbyists.

IoT How-To
Intel is already laying out how its Galileo platform can be used for simple IoT applications.
Intel is already laying out how its Galileo platform can be used for simple IoT applications.

The silicon powerhouse is also doing its best to stimulate interest in the market. It has been running a Make It Wearable contest, which is in its fourth round, with cash grants for the finalists.

"It's just one of the things we're doing to kickstart innovation," Foldesi said.

— Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, Light Reading

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sam masud
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sam masud,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/1/2014 | 7:43:17 PM
Re: Nice
Dunno--I'm thinking Bluffdale, UT.
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/1/2014 | 4:52:53 PM
Re: Nice
Sam is watching the NSA even more closely than the NSA is watching Sam.
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/1/2014 | 4:30:08 PM
Re: Nice
@Sam, I think the share amount of data there would make that sort of difficult. 
sam masud
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50%
sam masud,
User Rank: Light Sabre
7/1/2014 | 10:51:31 AM
Re: Nice
More things connected because of IoT seems me to provide more opportunity for NSA to collect lots more metadata.
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/28/2014 | 1:12:16 PM
Re: Nice
@Sam, why is that? 
Liz Greenberg
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Liz Greenberg,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/26/2014 | 1:18:08 PM
Re: Will Pi ARM itself to blow Raspberries at Intel?
Given Intel's history and intent, their solution is going to be more well rounded, thought out, and aimed for commercial enterprise straight out of the gate.  I see Pi as being the modern Heathkit but with very great support and possibilities beyond the old Heathkits.
DanJones
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DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
6/26/2014 | 12:16:56 PM
Re: Will Pi ARM itself to blow Raspberries at Intel?
The difference -- that I know about right now -- is that Intel has built the wireless in on Edison. You can easily buy a WiFi adapter  for the Raspberry PI of course. Would love to know the power reqs for Edison though...
DanJones
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DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
6/26/2014 | 11:42:24 AM
Re: Will Pi ARM itself to blow Raspberries at Intel?
Yeah, 

I know a few people that do some of these projects. Raspberry PI seems like the de facto option right now. This really is a young market now though.
DanJones
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DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
6/26/2014 | 11:40:43 AM
Re: Nice
How did we get to the NSA from wearables? 

The "surveillance economy" (a phrase I heard the other day to describe Goog, Facebook et al) still has plenty of data to mine from your smartphone location and online habits yet...
Liz Greenberg
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Liz Greenberg,
User Rank: Light Sabre
6/25/2014 | 4:33:01 PM
Will Pi ARM itself to blow Raspberries at Intel?
Inquiring minds want to know?  I know a set of engineering student at UC Berkeley who are totally part of the Raspberry Pi cust and they don't even consider the others.  Will the cult win out?  Probably not if Intel can take some of the mobile market.
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