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Huawei Pressures Its 400G Router Rivals

Ray Le Maistre
1/3/2014
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Huawei upped the ante in the core router market Friday by boasting of significant success for its 400G core router, which, the Chinese vendor claims, was deployed at 53 customers during the final five months of 2013. (See: Huawei Claims 400G Router Success.)

Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.'s NE5000E router, which can house up to 16 line cards, each capable of handling 400Gbit/s of traffic, has been placed at the heart of networks in more than 30 countries, including Spain, Thailand, Russia, and Saudi Arabia.

To show how serious it is about its challenge to the carrier network core router incumbents -- Cisco Systems Inc. and Juniper Networks Inc. -- Huawei puts its 400G system through a service provider-inspired proof of concept test at the European Advanced Networking Test Center AG (EANTC) earlier this year. (See: Huawei Router Passes 400G Test.)

Why this matters
Huawei has been knocking at the carrier router market door for years, and, along with Alcatel-Lucent, is making a serious play for market share in the IP core as operators invest in the networks that support fixed, and, increasingly, mobile broadband traffic (including video).

The Chinese vendor is particularly keen to be taken seriously as network operators make next generation network infrastructure decisions hence the EANTC test. And even though Huawei's press release is (naturally) full of self-praise, the more conservative and granular test results report from the team at EANTC, which can be accessed here, is also positive, meaning Huawei has something to shout about.

That also means Cisco and Juniper have something to worry about, particularly as Huawei appears to have made notable gains in a short period of time, putting it in third place in terms of market share in the third quarter of 2013, according to Dell'Oro.

Cisco, with its nPower X1 chip, is in the early stages of its 400G router push, Alcatel-Lucent is betting its new strategy on the success of its IP division (including its FP3 400G chip), and Juniper is yet to deliver 400G line cards for its T4000 core router, so Huawei is putting its main rivals under pressure with its momentum.

For more on this topic:

— Ray Le Maistre, Editor-in-Chief, Light Reading

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sam masud
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sam masud,
User Rank: Light Sabre
1/6/2014 | 9:47:08 AM
Re: Competition
Indeed, and we know which is that "one country." It doesn't take any great insight--for those who have followed the trajectory of Huawei's rise--to see that it is only a matter of time when the title of the 600-pound (or is it 800-pound?) gorilla can no longer be coveted Cisco. If Wal-Mart can work with the Chinese, then surely our service providers should have no problem doing so. It's a global world, right?
DOShea
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DOShea,
User Rank: Blogger
1/3/2014 | 4:41:17 PM
Competition
In terms of technology, it really looks like they are ready to challenge Cisco and Juniper, but in some countries, or at least one country for certain, Huawei unfortunately will not be judged on technology alone.
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