& cplSiteName &

Parallels Finding Cash in Clouds

Carol Wilson
6/29/2011
50%
50%

Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT)'s new cloud push is creating some sunny days at Parallels Inc. , the software company that automates the processes that enable broadband service providers to sell Microsoft applications as cloud services. (See Microsoft Calls On Telcos for Office 365.)

Parallels enables service providers to get into the Internet-apps business more rapidly, providing Microsoft-approved companies with the APIs [application programming interfaces] that automate the process of linking to the Microsoft cloud and handling billing and settlements. Prior to this week's Microsoft Office 365 announcement, Parallels had done major business connecting carrier clouds to its predecessor, Microsoft Business Productivity Online Standard Suite (BPOS), for companies such as Charter Communications Inc. (See Charter Clouds Up For SMBs.)

The new Microsoft cloud services are teed up well for delivering to the SMB market, says John Zanni, VP of service provider marketing and alliances for Parallels, but the more savvy service providers are adding their own differentiation to the service mix as well.

"SMBs are looking at someone to become their IT provider -- and service providers are a natural choice, because they are already getting their broadband connections and a domain from them," Zanni says. "When you look at the type of IT services they need, email is first that comes to mind, and Microsoft 365 enables them to get a business-class level of email, with calendaring and contacts. Plus Microsoft manages it and updates it."

Parallels increasingly sees service providers adding their own cloud services, hosted from their data centers, to a bundle that includes what Microsoft delivers, but offers more features like hosted PBXs, security or automated backup services.

Part of Parallels' secret sauce is an open standard it developed called APS, which helps automate the process of adding services and incorporating the way they need to be provisioned with their licensing terms, so they can be added to a service plan, Zanni says.

"Our software sits in the service provider data center and we work with them to configure that software, make sure they are on the right architecture and manage and maintain that software," Zanni comments. That includes managing Microsoft's updates and providing automated tools that troubleshoot problems.

— Carol Wilson, Chief Editor, Events, Light Reading

(1)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
digits
50%
50%
digits,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:00:42 PM
re: Parallels Finding Cash in Clouds


Microsoft is clearly having anoteh stab at the somms/information delivery business and I think it's on an M&A roll -- it wouldn't surprise me if Parallels ended up as part of the Microsoft universe. 

Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading founder Steve Saunders grills Cisco's Roland Acra on how he's bringing automation to life inside the data center.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
March 20-22, 2018, Denver Marriott Tech Center
March 22, 2018, Denver, Colorado | Denver Marriott Tech Center
March 28, 2018, Kansas City Convention Center
April 4, 2018, The Westin Dallas Downtown, Dallas
April 9, 2018, Las Vegas Convention Center
May 14-16, 2018, Austin Convention Center
September 25-27, 2018, Denver, Colorado
October 23, 2018, Georgia World Congress Centre, Atlanta, GA
November 8, 2018, The Montcalm by Marble Arch, London
November 15, 2018, The Westin Times Square, New York
December 4-6, 2018, Lisbon, Portugal
All Upcoming Live Events
Hot Topics
Trump Says Foxconn Will Make iPhones in US
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 1/15/2018
Net Neutrality Moves Are as Futile as Trump's Comb-Over
Iain Morris, News Editor, 1/18/2018
Huawei, ZTE Face US Federal Ban
Iain Morris, News Editor, 1/15/2018
Analyst: Verizon's Fixed 5G Is a Loss Leader for Mobile
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 1/16/2018
Ericsson Lurches to $1.8B Write-Down
Iain Morris, News Editor, 1/16/2018
Animals with Phones
Live Digital Audio

A CSP's digital transformation involves so much more than technology. Crucial – and often most challenging – is the cultural transformation that goes along with it. As Sigma's Chief Technology Officer, Catherine Michel has extensive experience with technology as she leads the company's entire product portfolio and strategy. But she's also no stranger to merging technology and culture, having taken a company — Tribold — from inception to acquisition (by Sigma in 2013), and she continues to advise service providers on how to drive their own transformations. This impressive female leader and vocal advocate for other women in the industry will join Women in Comms for a live radio show to discuss all things digital transformation, including the cultural transformation that goes along with it.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed