& cplSiteName &

Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries

Light Reading
News Analysis
Light Reading
5/10/2005
50%
50%

After IPTV networks are built and a subscriber signs up, the carrier can breathe easy, right? Maybe not. U.S. carriers say one of the biggest IPTV challenges they face is making IPTV service available on all the TVs in a household (see NAB2005: Telco Video Bingo).

The IPTV signal typically enters the household via an Ethernet connection to an ADSL modem, which connects to a set-top box, which plugs into the TV (see Scientific-Atlanta Wins $195M SBC Deal). But U.S. households typically have two or three televisions and the various costs of running new CAT-5 cable to those additional sets are substantial.

“It’s what I call the dirty little secret of IPTV,” says Entone Technologies Inc. CEO Steve McCay. “The huge issue today is that it’s one thing to get the signal to one TV, but what if you have four or five TVs in the home?” (See BNS Expands With Entone IPTV .)

To get the IPTV signal from the main TV to sets in the bedrooms costs about $800, according to some accounts of carriers delivering IPTV today. Here’s how it breaks down: two additional set-top boxes at $150 each, new CAT-5 cabling at $50, approximately eight hours of skilled installation at $50 per hour, and a “windshield cost” (gas and depreciation on the service vehicle) of $50.

“We do truck rolls where I was hoping they would do the installation in 2 hours and they are there for 6 hours,” says Bill DeMuth, CTO of SureWest Communications (Nasdaq: SURW), which has offered IPTV service since 2002 (see IPTV Scramble Is On). “This is our biggest problem.”

So who pays for such a big headache? Coaxsys Inc. director of marketing Ted Archer says that IPTV operators all have different ways of dealing with the costs.

Some will offer limited or no inside wiring to go along with an IPTV installation, Archer says. But he maintains that carriers really aren't in a position to demand a big upfront fee from their customers.

“From the customer’s prospective, if you look at them and say 'I’m going to charge you $350 in installation charges,' they’ll just stay with their cable service,” Archer says.

Satellite providers offer prospective customers two rooms of free installation to move from cable to satellite. Add that to the free months of service often included in the deal, and you arrive at an average customer acquisition cost of around $700, cable industry researchers say.

Adding to the telecom carrier stakes is the fact that once a carrier wires a new subscriber's home, it loses that investment if the subscriber cancels their service, because the wiring can't be taken back.

While carriers are figuring out this quagmire, several equipment vendors are stepping in with suggested solutions. Coaxsys, Entone, and a few other companies market devices that allow the IPTV signal to travel over existing coaxial cable to the other TVs in the home.

San Mateo, Calif.-based Entone makes a gateway device, called Hydra, which terminates a single Ethernet connection and sends the IPTV signal over coax to each TV in the house, eliminating the need for separate set-top boxes, McCay says.

Coaxsys uses a slightly different approach (see Consolidated Uses Coaxsys for IPTV). Its device, called TVNet, creates an in-home IP network that utilizes coax to link to each set-top box in the house, and can support other IP devices such as digital video recorders (DVRs) and gaming devices in other parts of the home.

The set-top box makers are also getting into the act. Amino Technologies plc and ReadyLinks Inc. have teamed up to develop a HPNA adapter called the ReadyLinks SmartFoot that links Amino set-top boxes to the others in the home using coax or telephone wiring.

The solution to the home wiring problem could eventually be a wireless one. Wireless chipmaker Airgo Networks Inc. has developed a high-bandwidth chip utilizing the 802.11n standard, which, when baked into set-top boxes, will allow wireless communication among all IP-speaking devices in the household, says Airgo spokesman Joe Volat.

In the U.S., the only IPTV installations being deployed so far are by small, regional telephone companies. But larger carriers, such as SBC, are aware of the problem and will have to figure out a way around it soon enough (see SBC Touts IPTV Servicesand SBC: IPTV's Day Has Come).

The only thing that's clear at this point is that no standard way of handling home wiring exists. “Some telcos are saying ‘we’ll give you one TV,’ or they’re saying ‘we’ll give you two TVs but we’re not going to put the wiring inside your house,’ while others are saying ‘we’re just going to take the time and wire all the rooms and just get it done,’” Coaxsys's Archer says.

— Mark Sullivan, Reporter, Light Reading

(18)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
RTL Rules
50%
50%
RTL Rules,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:48 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
Sorry for an OT question, but what does the phrase "baked into" mean?

Is it actually referring to a process, like a scheme to integrate the 802.11 antenna into a housing, or is it just a way to say "designed into".

Sorry, just feeling old today...

RTL
(not my initials! Resistor Transistor Logic...)
2bits
50%
50%
2bits,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:42 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
Why are installers spending up to 8 hours wiring houses with cat 5 cabling to support IP-TV?

802.11g has a maximum throughput of 54Mbps. If (lets say) 2/3 of that is the average working bandwidth, then we have 36Mbps available. Isn't that sufficient for video?
DanJones
50%
50%
DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
12/5/2012 | 3:15:35 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
Indeed, wireless seems to be the only way that seems to make economic sense.

"802.11g has a maximum throughput of 54Mbps. If (lets say) 2/3 of that is the average working bandwidth, then we have 36Mbps available. Isn't that sufficient for video?"

This should be enough yes, but there could be intereference problems as g kit runs over 2.4GHz unlicensed band. It will depend how much other equipment you and your neighbours have running in the 2.4GHz band (This could include access points, cordless phones, wireless video cameras, baby monitors...).

This is part of the reason some manufacturers are looking at 5GHz 802.11a. More channels, less traffic.

DJ
TelecomTech
50%
50%
TelecomTech,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:34 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
802.11g is absolutely not sufficient to support to video. That 54Mbps is not guaranteed that is optimal conditions i.e. right next to the wireless access point. The 54Mbps rate drops significantly every foot. Start adding walls, addition levels, and other wireless traffic that rate drops further. Also, with video one cannot have the packet loss that occurs with any of the available wireless technologies. Video needs guaranteed speed. When one currently accesses the internet via wireless, dropping packets is okay/somewhat acceptable; can you image that while watching TV??? For example, look at what happens when satellite signals pixelate and how annoying that is; now image it much, much worseGǪthat is video on current wireless technology. Furthermore, what about multiple video streams? Add another TV into the situation and well you get the point.

Maybe future wireless technology such as UWB (UltraWideband) can handle video but thatGÇÖs still realistically 5 years way for consumers.

Additionally, the coax wiring could serve as a wireless GÇ£backboneGÇ¥ enabling multiple wireless access points through out the home. This would help improve wireless access in the home.
rjmcmahon
50%
50%
rjmcmahon,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:34 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
Indeed, wireless seems to be the only way that seems to make economic sense.

Some anecdotal data.

When we owned a TIVO and wanted to watch a show on other TVs in the house, we found the easiest way was via the existing cable plant. We bought an RF Modulator for a few hundred dollars and connected it to the in home COAX. The DVD, VCR and TIVO were all connected to the modulator. It worked fine even with the devices were attached to a leaf node of the cable plant. (We did put a low pass filter on the outside of the house filtering the signals used by the modulator.) The only problem was the lack of a remote control, which didn't really matter too much.

http://www.smarthomeusa.com/Sh...

My take home is that a way to connect video signals to the TV, besides a DVD, is using the existing cable plant.

It's worth noting that my kids don't really use this anymore and don't watch TV either. They choose the computer and it's interactivity, or better, they like it when we read books or play games together. Most channel offerings distributed by the cable operators just don't compete with the offerings found on the internet (nor with family time.)
tonyz
50%
50%
tonyz,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:30 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
I don't believe any 802.11 technology will help here. Even with MAC, PHY and antenna enhancements, you're simply not going to be able to support a requirement for two HD streams to anywhere in 99% of random home samples.

For reasons of interference, lack of QoS regime amongst you and your neighbors eqpt, lack of range due to wall materials, etc... the list goes on for ever.

The final solution for video distribution in the home will be wired, and it will be either powerline or Ethernet or coax or HPNA, but it will be a wired solution, esp if 802.11 based technologies are the competing approach.

But I'll probably end up being proved wrong by some future tweaks of 802.11.
issey
50%
50%
issey,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:29 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
How about 802.11n ??
tonyz
50%
50%
tonyz,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:26 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
802.11n? I am guessing of course, but .n will help some of the home locations in some of the homes get enough reception, but from a service providers point of view, 802.11n won't get them something that won't frustrate 10-40% of installations. So, not good enough.
vrparente
50%
50%
vrparente,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:25 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
Sony's "Location Free TV" product is WiFi based (802.11a/b/g). It's not that there can't or won't be issues with WiFi -- it's that wireless provides a solution to the wired and mobile problem. After all the idea of watching TV on a "location free tv" or on a tablet (what's the difference) is here to stay and grow.
RTL Rules
50%
50%
RTL Rules,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 3:15:24 AM
re: Carriers Claim IPTV Wiring Worries
Anyone have a feel for whether content providers would be comfortable with the use of wireless links? They're pretty protective, demanding encryption on wired links, so "wireless" might push some buttons...

This isn't a technical question about good/bad or 802.11 encryption, BTW.

RTL
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Light Reading’s Upskill U is a FREE, interactive, online educational resource that delivers must-have education on themes that relate to the overall business transformation taking place in the communications industry.
NEXT COURSE
Wednesday, September 14, 1:00PM EDT
What Is Agile?
Kent J. McDonald, Product Owner, Agile Alliance
UPCOMING COURSE SCHEDULE
Friday, September 16, 1:00PM EDT
How to Implement Agile
Alan Bateman, Director, Agile Transformation
Wednesday, September 21, 1:00PM EDT
What Is DevOps?
Colin Kincaid, CTO, Service Provider, Cisco
Friday, September 23, 1:00PM EDT
How to Implement DevOps
Burt Klein, DevOps Strategist, Tech Mahindra
in association with:
From The Founder
Light Reading today starts a new voyage as part of a larger Enterprise.
Flash Poll
Live Streaming Video
Charting the CSP's Future
Six different communications service providers join to debate their visions of the future CSP, following a landmark presentation from AT&T on its massive virtualization efforts and a look back on where the telecom industry has been and where it's going from two industry veterans.
LRTV Huawei Video Resource Center
Are You Ready for Huawei Connect 2016?

8|31|16   |     |   (0) comments


Join us for an exclusive sneak peak of Huawei Connect, an integrated conference for the global ICT ecosystem taking place in Shanghai.
Between the CEOs
CEO Chat: UXP's Gemini Waghmare

8|26|16   |     |   (0) comments


Light Reading CEO Steve Saunders and UXP Systems CEO Gemini Waghmare discuss the strategic importance of digital identity for operators in the midst of transformation.
LRTV Custom TV
F5 Virtual Network Function Integrations With Partner Orchestration Platform

8|24|16   |   6:38   |   (0) comments


F5's Kishore Patnam, product manager for F5's service provider solutions, discusses why service providers are moving towards virtualization and how his clients are utilizing F5's solutions.
Between the CEOs
CEO Chat: Intel's Alexis Black Bjorlin

8|17|16   |   06:23   |   (0) comments


Join us for an in-depth interview between Steve Saunders of Light Reading and Alexis Black Bjorlin of Intel as they discuss the release of the company's Silicon Photonics platform, its performance, long-term prospects, customer expectations and much more.
Telecom Innovators Video Showcase
Accelerating Telecom Digital Transformation With Nominum DNS

8|1|16   |   12:04   |   (0) comments


Light Reading's Steve Saunders gets an update from Nominum CEO Gary Messiana on how his company is helping carriers on the digital transformation journey.
LRTV Custom TV
Reinventing Operations for a Virtual, Software-Defined World

7|28|16   |   5:23   |   (0) comments


Heavy Reading Senior Analyst Jim Hodges speaks with Accenture's Larry Socher and Matt Anderson about what service providers must do to transform their business to get the benefits of SDN and NFV including: leveraging DevOps, introducing real-time OSS and implementing analytics.
Women in Comms Introduction Videos
Fujitsu Sales Leader Shares Lessons Learned

7|27|16   |   5:12   |   (1) comment


As Fujitsu's only female sales leader, Annie Bogue knows the importance of asking for what you want, being flexible (she's been relocated five times), keeping a meticulous calendar, 'leaning in,' working harder than everyone else around you, being aware and more.
Telecom Innovators Video Showcase
VeEX Test & Measurement Solutions

7|25|16   |   08:57   |   (0) comments


Cyrille Morelle, president and CEO of VeEX Inc., talks test and measurement with Light Reading's Steve Saunders at BCE 2016. This includes innovative products such as VeSion Cloud-Based platform for network monitoring; MTTplus Modular Test platform for Access, Business, Carrier Ethernet, Transport and Core services; and OPX-BOX+ for Fiber Optics.
LRTV Custom TV
VeEX: Live From BCE 2016

7|25|16   |   03:20   |   (0) comments


VeEX's Senior Director of Business Development, Perry Romano, explains how VeEX provides tools to help install, maintain, monitor and manage network infrastructure efficiently and effectively. The portfolio of products on display include the RXT-6000, MTTplus and TX300s.
LRTV Custom TV
Real-Time Telemetry & Analytics for Intelligent SDN Orchestration

7|25|16   |   03:09   |   (0) comments


Packet Design CEO Scott Sherwood discusses how real-time network telemetry and analytics are enabling a new breed of SDN orchestration applications.
From the Founder
The Russo Report: Driving Disruption

7|25|16   |   07:44   |   (2) comments


In the first episode of a four-part series, Light Reading Founder and CEO Steve Saunders and Calix President and CEO Carl Russo drive around town discussing the disruptive mega-changes in the communications industry and where hope lies for service providers to meet the escalating demands of the cloud.
LRTV Custom TV
NetScout: Maximizing Enterprise Cloud for Digital Transformation

7|20|16   |   04:53   |   (0) comments


Light Reading Editor Mitch Wagner talks to NetScout CMO Jim McNiel about maximizing the benefits of enterprise cloud and digital transformation while minimizing potential pitfalls with a proper monitoring and instrumentation strategy.
Upcoming Live Events
September 13-14, 2016, The Curtis Hotel, Denver, CO
November 3, 2016, The Montcalm Marble Arch, London
November 30, 2016, The Westin Times Square, New York City
December 1, 2016, The Westin Times Square, New York, NY
December 6-8, 2016, The Westin Excelsior, Rome
May 16-17, 2017, Austin Convention Center, Austin, TX
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
Hot Topics
Google Fiber Can't Be Called a Failure
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 8/26/2016
FirstNet: A Billion-Dollar Boondoggle?
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 8/26/2016
WiCipedia: Should Men Be Included? & Olympians Face Discrimination
Eryn Leavens, Special Features & Copy Editor, 8/26/2016
Is There No Stopping Huawei?
Iain Morris, News Editor, 8/26/2016
600MHz Auction Climbs Over $22B
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 8/29/2016
Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
BETWEEN THE CEOs - Executive Interviews
Light Reading CEO Steve Saunders and UXP Systems CEO Gemini Waghmare discuss the strategic importance of digital identity for operators in the midst of transformation.
Join us for an in-depth interview between Steve Saunders of Light Reading and Alexis Black Bjorlin of Intel as they discuss the release of the company's Silicon Photonics platform, its performance, long-term prospects, customer expectations and much more.
Animals with Phones
Live Digital Audio

Bridging the tech skills gap is a major challenge for service providers and suppliers alike today – and the challenge is two-fold when it comes to increasing the number of women in the comms space. Level 3 Communications has made it a priority to overcome both challenges by implementing several unique programs focused on building the right candidates from within – in addition to filling the funnel by supporting STEM and other education programs. During this radio show, you’ll learn about these programs from Mary Beth McGrath, SVP of Global Talent Management at Level 3, and the best ways to bridge your own skills gap so that you are motivated and equipped for change. Plus you’ll have the chance to ask Mary Beth your questions live on the air.