& cplSiteName &

AT&T Gets Its Fastest Smartphone Yet

Sarah Thomas
5/5/2011
50%
50%

Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. (Korea: SEC) will bring what it is calling the fastest smartphone yet, the Inspire 4G, to AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) on May 15. The phone will be the first to run on AT&T's HSPA+ network at 21Mbit/s.

AT&T has the largest HSPA+ of any of its competitors, and it plans to tout this advantage even as it rolls out Long Term Evolution (LTE). To do that, it's going to need smartphones that take advantage of the faster speeds and support simultaneous voice and data. (See CES 2011: AT&T Accelerates LTE Push.)

"So the Infuse 4G really is HSPA+, unlike the Inspire, Atrix, and Veer. Take note!" tech blogger Chris Ziegler tweeted, jibing AT&T for wavering on its definition of 4G in the past.

For what it's worth, the carrier has now taken a definitive stand, telling PC Mag that it defines 4G as "14.4Mbit/s devices connected to high-speed backhaul at cell sites."

They say
That makes the Infuse (along with the 14.4 Mbit/s HP Inc. (NYSE: HPQ) Veer, also launching May 15) the first truly 4G smartphone for the carrier, by its own definition. And it appears to be a good start. Boy Genius Report blogger Jonathan Gellar writes, "This is by far our favorite Android device from Samsung so far."

The $199 smartphone is also Samsung's thinnest at 8.99mm and largest Super AMOLED display at 4.5 inches. CNET was impressed that the phone didn't feel "so plasticky and slick like the first-generation of Galaxy S phones," and called the massive device's screen sharp and vibrant.

A few reviews expressed disappointment that the phone will only be running Android 2.2 at launch and that it features a single-core processor, not the dual-core that's becoming common in advanced devices. Techno Buffalo Editor-at-Large Noah Kravitz also questioned the validity of the 4G speeds. "AT&T Samsung Infuse 4G ... stretches the definition of '4G' just a little bit IMO [in my opinion]," he tweeted.

We say
The definition of 4G has become so convoluted that Light Reading Mobile made up its own name for it: FauxG. More important is how the device performs.

AT&T will need to continue to add to its lineup of strong smartphone performers as it gears up for an LTE launch later this year. The carrier plans to add more than 20 additional 4G devices to its lineup this year, as it confirmed at an event with Samsung to launch the phone.



— Sarah Reedy, Senior Reporter, Light Reading Mobile

(1)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading is spending much of this year digging into the details of how automation technology will impact the comms market, but let's take a moment to also look at how automation is set to overturn the current world order by the middle of the century.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
March 20-22, 2018, Denver Marriott Tech Center
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
SmartNICs aren't just about achieving scale. They also have a major impact in reducing CAPEX and OPEX requirements.
Hot Topics
Nokia Bell Labs & Verizon Stretch Fixed 5G to the Home
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 11/13/2017
Juniper's New Contrail VP Hails From Google
Craig Matsumoto, Editor-in-Chief, Light Reading, 11/15/2017
Eurobites: Telefónica Reckons Plastic Is Fantastic for FTTH
Paul Rainford, Assistant Editor, Europe, 11/15/2017
Animals with Phones
Why Cats Don't Run Tech Support Click Here
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
The Mobile Broadband Road Ahead
By Kevin Taylor, for Huawei
All Partner Perspectives