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Cisco's Videoscape Stresses Cloud Control

Craig Matsumoto
1/10/2012
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Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) is adding to last year's Videoscape announcement, giving the architecture the ability to handle video transcoding in the network.

The additions being announced Tuesday morning at the 2012 International CES, some coming from acquisitions such as BNI Video and Inlet Technologies, are particularly targeted at cable providers. Cable is making the transition to IP video delivery but will be supporting QAM for some time.

Some of the pieces being introduced include:

  • Videoscape Voyager Virtual: Cloud-based software that prepares IP-based video for MPEG-2 set-top boxes
  • Cisco Media Processor and Transcode Manager: Two network-based features that convert video to adaptive bit rate; the former works on the fly, while the latter is more of a batch job (for long-term assets such as video-on-demand content).
  • Videoscape Multiscreen Gateways: Set-tops, essentially, designed to receive both QAM and IP video. The 9800 series, being introduced today, can record six HD streams at once.


Why this matters
Cisco doesn't have a Flip camera line or ūmi telepresence system to talk about at CES, but it does still want to be relevant to consumer video. The company's long-term plan has been to turn video delivery into a network function.

As executives indicated last year, Cisco wants to provide the infrastructure to match up all video services with all devices. Transcoding, and the magic that lets any video get formatted for any end device, should be within the purview of the network, in Cisco's view. Tuesday's Videoscape additions move Cisco closer to that goal.

For more
A review of some of Cisco's video moves:

— Craig Matsumoto, Managing Editor, Light Reading

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Pete Baldwin
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Pete Baldwin,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:46:07 PM
re: Cisco's Videoscape Stresses Cloud Control


Definitely a sophomore kind of release, despite the number of things being launched. You can't have a big Videoscape launch every year!


Cisco is certainly sticking to its guns about having things like transcoding become the domain of the network. That makes sense in a lot of ways, but I'm sure there are plenty of companies around CES that have other ideas.

craigleddy
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craigleddy,
User Rank: Blogger
12/5/2012 | 5:46:06 PM
re: Cisco's Videoscape Stresses Cloud Control


Videoscape is a comprehensive platform for IP video, but are U.S. cable MSOs buying into it?


MSOs definitely have come a long way in their thinking about IP for all video delivery. But, in typical fashion, they seem to be going about things through piecemeal development and don't want to be beholden to one vendor, as much as they probably agree with Cisco's holistic approach.


Cisco did announce Videoscape customers, but not ones in the U.S.: Rogers in Canada, YES in Israel and Numericable in France.   


 


 


 

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