& cplSiteName &

Adobe & thePlatform Tie TVE Knot

Alan Breznick
4/10/2014
50%
50%

LAS VEGAS — After working together informally on multiscreen video rollouts for years, thePlatform and Adobe have formalized their relationship by striking a co-promotion deal and integrating many of their TV Everywhere products in a joint portfolio.

thePlatform Inc. , a white-label media publishing company owned by Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK), and Adobe Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: ADBE) unveiled their "strategic relationship" this week at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) convention here. The two companies said they will team up to sell the Adobe Primetime platform and thePlatform's video management system as part of "an end-to-end IP video solution" for both TV programmers and distributors.

The companies said they will receive incentives to drive business for each other. Under the non-exclusive agreement, both partners are still free to sell their products separately to customers. Adobe and thePlatform executives said that some media companies still prefer to build their own video management systems with individual elements pieced together from different vendors.

But the partners also said they intend to join forces much, if not most, of the time to promote their bundled offerings together and to help customers deploy multiscreen services faster and easier. They said they have built up considerable trust by working side by side on a number of TVE deployments for common customers over nearly a decade, including NBC Universal 's multiscreen coverage of the Sochi Winter Olympic Games. (See Adobe Preps for Sochi Games.)

"One of the exciting things is that we have a common vision and view of where the television industry is heading," said Ashley Still, director of project management for Adobe, which also introduced an upgraded version of Primetime at the NAB show. "Now we have skin in the game and are definitely making a bet on each other."

Specifically, the deal calls for thePlatform to contribute its signature mpx video management system to the partnership effort. This cloud-based video workflow management system will enable joint customers to publish video for playback on Adobe's Primetime video players, create custom video players for different devices, ingest video, dynamically update online video changes, manage and enhance metadata of all video assets, and set viewing rights, playback authorization, and monetization policies for content, among other things.

Adobe will contribute its flagship Primetime TV delivery and monetization platform to the venture. Among other things, Primetime will add management of subscriber authentication, digital rights management, ad insertion techniques, data analytics services, and service quality monitoring to the combined offering.

"Nobody else is an analog of what Primetime is," said Ian Blaine, CEO of thePlatform. Both companies have "open frameworks, so they're relatively easy to integrate."

Blaine and Still conceded that the two companies face several challenges in making their partnership work. Those challenges include finding ways of serving the ever-growing number of video-capable devices, hitting every available window for different types of video releases, and measuring the actual audience reach of multiscreen video services. Without such effective audience measurement, they said, the monetization of TVE services will be exceedingly difficult, if not impossible.

Nevertheless, with second-screen viewing rising rapidly on tablets, smartphones, and other newer video devices, the executives don't seem too worried about proving there's a sizable multiscreen audience out there. Further, in spite of initial industry concerns that the second and third screens might draw viewers away from the home TV screen, the executives are not worried about multiscreen video services sapping the traditional TV viewing audience anymore. (See Nielsen: Multiscreen Viewing Taking Off.)

"Devices are really additive to the overall TV experience," Still said. "Online TV is not cannibalizing TV." Instead, it is "enabling completely new models of TV watching, like binge viewing."

— Alan Breznick, Cable/Video Practice Leader, Light Reading

(1)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Ariella
50%
50%
Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/13/2014 | 10:29:43 PM
TV
"Online TV is not cannibalizing TV." Instead, it is "enabling completely new models of TV watching, like binge viewing." Somehow that doesn't sound altogether positive. Could you imagine a liquor company boasting of enabling binge drinking? Or a junk food manufacturer applauding occasions for binge eating?
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading is spending much of this year digging into the details of how automation technology will impact the comms market, but let's take a moment to also look at how automation is set to overturn the current world order by the middle of the century.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
November 1, 2017, The Royal Garden Hotel
November 1, 2017, The Montcalm Marble Arch
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue, London, UK
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue – London
November 10, 2017, The Westin Times Square, New York, NY
November 16, 2017, ExCel Centre, London
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
May 14-17, 2018, Austin Convention Center
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
With the mobile ecosystem becoming increasingly vulnerable to security threats, AdaptiveMobile has laid out some of the key considerations for the wireless community.
Hot Topics
Muni Policies Stymie Edge Computing
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/17/2017
Is US Lurching Back to Monopoly Status?
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
Pai's FCC Raises Alarms at Competitive Carriers
Carol Wilson, Editor-at-large, 10/16/2017
'Brutal' Automation & the Looming Workforce Cull
Iain Morris, News Editor, 10/18/2017
Worried About Bandwidth for 4K? Here Comes 8K!
Aditya Kishore, Practice Leader, Video Transformation, Telco Transformation, 10/17/2017
Animals with Phones
Selfie Game Strong Click Here
Latest Comment
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
Partner Perspectives - content from our sponsors
The Mobile Broadband Road Ahead
By Kevin Taylor, for Huawei
All Partner Perspectives