& cplSiteName &

Video Killed the Radio Star – Redux

Gemini Waghmare
2/17/2014
50%
50%

I think of the evolution of music technology as having two distinct phases: The first phase took place in the 100 or so years before I was born, and the second over the last 40 years of my lifetime. And surely the latter has witnessed the more rapid and significant degree of change.

After all, the gramophone was invented in 1880s and radio in the 1890s, and they remained the staples of music consumption until the early 1970s. After I was born (and unrelated to that specific event!), the pace of innovation started picking up with the invention of magnetic tape recordings such as reel-to-reel, 8-tracks, and cassettes.

Since then, we've gone from Walkmans to ill-fated digital audio tapes to compact discs to MP3 players and finally to rights-managed digital music like iTunes. And now, with the emergence of the cloud, digital music can slowly sneak its way from the device into the ether, just as Pandora Media Inc. , Songza, and Sirius Satellite Radio (Nasdaq: SIRI) have already done.

But while everyone is focused on the transition of music from physical to digital and from device to cloud, another paradigm shift is afoot. This shift is in the sound systems themselves. Have you noticed that household stereos have moved across the living rooms and have merged into our TV systems? That's in stark contrast to my first real "hi-fi" system, a big investment in sound and fury that was tucked away in a wall unit that sat beside -- but had absolutely no connection to -- my television.

Today, most of us have integrated sound systems, with audio-video receivers that pump HD surround-sound from TV programming with more dimensions than an average room. The merging of audio systems into video systems brings the movie theater experience home, but it also it makes the screen a great navigation device for the audiophile.

One of our VPs, a frequent entertainer, plays music at his get-togethers from his Apple-TV, connected to the television in his living room. While his TV is far from home-theater-sized, he's wired an amazing sound system to it that permeates every corner of the house. And his TV gives everyone the right to "own the remote" and pick their songs.

For cable operators, this presents a massive opportunity that became evident to me last month. Michael Jackson’s This is It concert video was on, and my kids, aged 2 and 6, were mesmerized watching a larger-than-life King of Pop in Dolby Digital on our wall-projected screen. What if my cable operator found a way to pump an endless and engaging supply of songs and music videos to the best sound system in my house?

Apple may forever have a role in managing my existing music collection, but I would gladly replace Internet radio and music video DVDs with a compelling and personalized IPTV-based music service. Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK), DirecTV Group Inc. (NYSE: DTV), and Roku Inc. offer Pandora today, but the opportunity for more variety and personalization of music on TV is nascent.

In 1980, MTV made its debut with its first video, Video Killed the Radio Star. While music videos don't have the same appeal they once did, and radio limps on, maybe IPTV will once again breathe new life into the TV industry's music ambitions.

— Gemini Waghmare, Founder & CEO, UXP Systems

(13)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
danielcawrey
50%
50%
danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/24/2014 | 2:52:30 PM
Re: Video saves the Radio Star...sometimes
Interesting comment about "electronic esoterica". 

I keep seeing advertising for interesting devices. One example is the bluetooth powered speaker system that allows people to share music. 

I think there is potential fornew devices that utilize low-energy bluetooth or NFC. 
SachinEE
50%
50%
SachinEE,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/24/2014 | 1:20:20 PM
Re : Video Killed the Radio Star – Redux
I think the radio still has a long way to go. About cable companies giving bad services, we have to remember that the world is going wireless, and cable is a thing of the past. I think good management may get the flow going, however that depends unless a cutting edge technology is driving this forward.
Liz Greenberg
50%
50%
Liz Greenberg,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/19/2014 | 12:06:05 PM
Re: Video saves the Radio Star...sometimes
Al, it would be a good question to the cable providers since they probably have to be force to do provide radio.  I know that when Comcast started rolling out digital here, the first thing that they wanted to do was can radio so that they could free up bandwidth for more moronic TV stations that few will watch.  They were not allowed to do that by our local government.  Up until that point, you could literally listen to radio for free over cable if you had an old box.  Now, you need to pay for the basic box but we still have radio.
Liz Greenberg
50%
50%
Liz Greenberg,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/19/2014 | 12:03:05 PM
Re: Video saves the Radio Star...sometimes
Jessie,  I think that the model we have here in Marin is pretty good.  I can have REAL radio stations so that I can experience a plethora of music, news or whatever as well as pre-canned mixes. Listening to the radio allows me to experience music that I might not hear anyway.  Due to the challenging terrain, I listen to SiriusXM in my car or again I would only have 1 to 2 channels!

It is feasible to say that ALL methods of music delivery are outdated including Pandora etc. since streaming music is well over 10 years old. However, we should not confuse length of time of something happening with something being outmoded...after all we are still listening with the same ears, brain, etc.  As an FYI some of us like all music from classical through current, although I have to say heavy metal isn't a favorite.
geminiwaghmare
50%
50%
geminiwaghmare,
User Rank: Blogger
2/19/2014 | 7:53:01 AM
Re: Video saves the Radio Star...sometimes
Hi Jesse,

Indeed my content is a little tired because I am stuck in the 80s.  Sorry for that.   In my defense I do know a handful of people that listen to Kanye, Katie Perry and Mumford and Sons, and Im sure that stuff sounds good on a home theatre sound system too.  Or maybe those guys don't watch or own TVs anyway and we and all the MSOs are doomed anyway!

G
geminiwaghmare
50%
50%
geminiwaghmare,
User Rank: Blogger
2/19/2014 | 7:49:17 AM
Re: Radio UI
mjgraves,

interesting angle on volume, i never thought about that... agreed that unless you have a full out home theater the experience may be sub-par

 

gemini
geminiwaghmare
50%
50%
geminiwaghmare,
User Rank: Blogger
2/19/2014 | 7:45:59 AM
Re: Radio UI
Hi Sarah,

With the move towards more IP based content delivery, I think the game is wide open.   There is no reason we can't put something like SoundCloud or Songza on the TV that is personalized to the individual and curates content dynamically based on social networks.  So what I'm envisioning here is much  more and app/widget like experience.

Gemini
albreznick
50%
50%
albreznick,
User Rank: Blogger
2/18/2014 | 9:36:07 PM
Re: Video saves the Radio Star...sometimes
Interesting, Liz. I wonder how many other Marin County situations there are out there. 
Jessie Morrow
50%
50%
Jessie Morrow,
User Rank: Lightning
2/18/2014 | 2:52:03 PM
Re: Video saves the Radio Star...sometimes
... content delivery is tired. 


And I would prefer to say that maybe the content is tired. When the only music mentioned in the article is that of a 4 or 5 year old concert from a then over-the-hill performer. But a discussion of current day music is way too far afield for this board. 

But, yes, granted music delivery is due for a change, everytime I come  across a high end receiver or speaker system I am surprised that they are still making these boxes  which were very commonplace a few decages ago but now can be truly called electronic esoterica.
danielcawrey
50%
50%
danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/18/2014 | 1:17:35 PM
Re: Video saves the Radio Star...sometimes
Interesting read. I sometimes feel like content delivery is tired. When you brought up the cable compaies, I thought about how outdated their model really is. 

It is important to consider just how poorly the cable companies are currently delivering content. It is out of whack in a Netflix-driven streaming world. 
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
More Blogs from Column
As the industry looks to aggressively ramp up NFV efforts, it becomes critical for strong and interoperable industry standards to eliminate vendor lock-ins and create a marketplace for best-in-breed services.
Today's telcos and communication service providers are more vulnerable to large-scale DDoS attacks than ever.
But this story will take years to write.
A few myths have emerged about microservices that need to be addressed, says Ciena's Abel Tong.
New and exciting methods of automation – whether virtualization, the cloud, IoT or even best practices like network segmentation – tend to emphasize innovation over visibility. As such, networks develop blind spots that mask network problems and even faulty devices.
From The Founder
Kicking off BCE 2017, Light Reading founder Steve Saunders lays blame for NFV's slow ramp-up and urges telecom to return to old-fashioned standards building and interoperability.
Flash Poll
Live Streaming Video
Charting the CSP's Future
Six different communications service providers join to debate their visions of the future CSP, following a landmark presentation from AT&T on its massive virtualization efforts and a look back on where the telecom industry has been and where it's going from two industry veterans.
LRTV Custom TV
VeEX at ANGA COM

6|27|17   |     |   (0) comments


At ANGA COM 2017, Cyrille Morelle, president and CEO of VeEX, updates Alan Breznick with VeEX's new products and technology. This includes VeSion cloud-based platform for network monitoring, AT2500-3G advanced spectrum analyzer and MTTplus-900 WiFi Air Expert module. He also comments on DOCSIS 3.1 deployment and Remote PHY technology.
LRTV Custom TV
The Overall Objective Is to Win the Game

6|26|17   |     |   (0) comments


SCTE•ISBE's Chris Bastian discusses Energy 2020's success to date and the importance of a flexible approach that allows for changes in specific strategies in order to reach significant milestones.
LRTV Interviews
CenturyLink: Let's Get Past SD-WAN Hype

6|23|17   |   04:02   |   (0) comments


Technology becomes a "shiny object" unless it's properly focused on solving business needs for enterprise customers, says Bill Grubbs, network solutions architect for CenturyLink. He explains to Light Reading why SD-WAN deployments have to be tailored to specific needs – and more.
Women in Comms Introduction Videos
Infinera's Sales Director Paints Tech's Big Picture

6|21|17   |   4:14   |   (1) comment


Shannon Williams, Infinera's director of sales, shares how she achieves work's many balancing acts -- between her role and the broader company, today and tomorrow's tech and more.
LRTV Custom TV
SD-WAN Innovation & Trends

6|20|17   |     |   (0) comments


Versa CEO Kelly Ahuja discusses with Carol Wilson the current status and trends in the SD-WAN market, Versa's innovation around building a software platform with broad contextualization, and the advantages that startups can bring to the SD-WAN market.
LRTV Interviews
Ovum's Dario Talmesio on 5G in Europe

6|20|17   |   02:16   |   (0) comments


At 5G World 2017, Dario Talmesio, principal analyst and practice leader on Ovum's fixed and mobile telecoms European team, explains the emerging trends amongst European operators as they prepare for 5G.
LRTV Custom TV
Putting Power on a Pedestal

6|19|17   |     |   (0) comments


ARRIS's John Ulm says a major accomplishment of SCTE•ISBE's Energy 2020 program is increased focus on power cost and consumption, including inclusion of energy requirements in operators' RFPs and RFIs.
LRTV Custom TV
Gigabit Access: The Last-Mile Pipe for All Future Services

6|19|17   |     |   (0) comments


A Gigabit access platform being deployed today must be able to deliver all types of services to an increasing number of devices. A non-blocking architecture is necessary to support the ever-increasing growth in bandwidth demand. The Huawei Gigabit access solution is based on a distributed design that is fully scalable to deliver a unprecedented performance.
LRTV Custom TV
Key Factors to Successfully Deploy an SD-WAN Service

6|19|17   |     |   (0) comments


As service providers transition their SD-WAN solution from trials and limited deployments into production at large scale, there are important considerations to successfully operationalize these solutions and realize their full potential, without adding complexity, introducing uncertainty or disrupting current business operations. Sunil Khandekar, CEO and Founder ...
LRTV Custom TV
IoT Solutions: Rational Exuberance

6|19|17   |     |   (0) comments


IoT solutions are morphing from hype into viable business opportunities. Huawei has the platform and ecosystem support to help carriers successfully address new business opportunities in the IoT space.
LRTV Custom TV
Realizing ICN as a Network Slice for Mobile Data Distribution

6|19|17   |     |   (1) comment


Network slicing in 5G allows the potential introduction of new network architectures such as Information-centric Networks (ICN) as a slice, managed over a shared pool of compute, storage and bandwidth resource. Services over an ICN slice can benefit from many architectural features such as Name Based Networking, Security, Multicasting, Multi-homing, Mobility, ...
LRTV Interviews
Ovum's Mike Roberts on 5G Uptake

6|19|17   |   04:08   |   (0) comments


Mike Roberts, research director for Ovum's service provider markets group, explains why he has boosted his 5G subscriptions forecast.
Upcoming Live Events
October 18, 2017, Colorado Convention Center - Denver, CO
November 1, 2017, The Montcalm Marble Arch
November 1, 2017, The Montcalm Marble Arch
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue, London, UK
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
With the mobile ecosystem becoming increasingly vulnerable to security threats, AdaptiveMobile has laid out some of the key considerations for the wireless community.
Hot Topics
No Imagination: UK Chip Biz Goes Up for Sale
Iain Morris, News Editor, 6/22/2017
Does AT&T Deserve Time Warner?
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 6/23/2017
Netflix's Lesson in Culture Expectation Settings
Sarah Thomas, Director, Women in Comms, 6/21/2017
Kalanick Steps Down as Uber CEO
Sarah Thomas, Director, Women in Comms, 6/21/2017
Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed
BETWEEN THE CEOs - Executive Interviews
Following a recent board meeting, the New IP Agency (NIA) has a new strategy to help accelerate the adoption of NFV capabilities, explains the Agency's Founder and Secretary, Steve Saunders.
One of the nice bits of my job (other than the teeny tiny salary, obviously) is that I get to pick and choose who I interview for this slot on the Light Reading home ...
Animals with Phones
Live Digital Audio

Playing it safe can only get you so far. Sometimes the biggest bets have the biggest payouts, and that is true in your career as well. For this radio show, Caroline Chan, general manager of the 5G Infrastructure Division of the Network Platform Group at Intel, will share her own personal story of how she successfully took big bets to build a successful career, as well as offer advice on how you can do the same. We’ll cover everything from how to overcome fear and manage risk, how to be prepared for where technology is going in the future and how to structure your career in a way to ensure you keep progressing. Chan, a seasoned telecom veteran and effective risk taker herself, will also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air.