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Platforms for Accelerating the Virtual Infrastructure by Heavy Reading
Information Resources  | 
9/19/2014  | 

The increasing use of smart devices, such as mobile phones and tablets, and cloud- based services, such as remote storage and video on demand (VoD), is driving data bandwidth and requiring a much more flexible network. Mobile networks require a complex infrastructure that includes systems to handle data and voice connectivity, quality of service (QoS) and subscriber management. Data centers need high- speed connectivity and access to storage and other resources based on the services being provided. Conventional networks require significant investment and can take days or weeks to provision.

SDN and NFV enable a virtualized infrastructure where functions and resources can be provisioned and reallocated to meet short-term requirements. This gives service providers significant flexibility in deploying expensive hardware resources to meet customer demands. Service providers are expecting to drive new revenues and dramatically increase return on investment (ROI) by using standard server platforms that support virtual functions.

The challenge for anyone deploying SDN and NFV is delivering these benefits while still maintaining line-rate performance. Many network ports that are already running at 10 Gbit/s will quickly move to 40 Gbit/s and 100 Gbit/s as data rates continue to increase. Virtual environments extend this challenge by increasing the East-West traffic between virtual functions running on different hardware platforms. The key to meeting this challenge is to deploy hardware platforms that can support the SDN- and NFV-based virtual infrastructure and have integrated hardware and software to support high-speed network interfaces and the acceleration of critical functions, such as security processing and load balancing.

The purpose of this white paper is to examine these issues. The paper explores the requirements for delivering line-speed performance in a virtual infrastructure environment and reviews an exciting solution to this challenge that is based on a 2U rack-mount chassis with four Intel Xeon E5-4600 v2 series processors, with up to 12 cores per processor, and integrated support for up to 640 Gbit/s of I/O bandwidth. This highly-integrated solution provides the flexibility to implement security acceleration up to 400 Gbit/s and stateful load balancing across many virtual servers and networking I/O. The platform supports multiple high-speed network interfaces, including 100 Gigabit Ethernet (100GE). The paper also describes an off-the-shelf soft- ware solution for supporting NFV and other virtual environments on this platform with line-rate performance.

HUAWEI SmartCare® - Helps Sunrise Improve Network Quality
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9/18/2014  | 

In September 2012 Sunrise changed technology partner and chose Huawei and a clear strategy of investment and quality improvement was defined. Based on the decision to start a new partnership, Sunrise launched a network quality improvement program aiming at offering the best network services and experience to its customers.

In order to quickly improve its Network Quality and win new customers, Sunrise began to use the HUAWEI SmartCare® Network and Service Quality Improvement (N&SQI) solution on its network.

The Pillars of a Next-Generation Enterprise Mobility Solution by Heavy Reading
Information Resources  | 
9/17/2014  | 

So of course, communications service providers are seeing increasing demand from their customers for mobile enterprise solutions. Enterprise customers represent "bulk" sales, covering multiple subscribers in a single sale. This is an attractive opportunity for service providers, which are eager to in- crease their ARPU. This is the underlying motivation for any small to midsize business (SMB) or enterprise-class offering. However, making a mistake in terms of product or vendor choice can have a devastating impact. Flawlessly accommodating the demands of a mobile enterprise is easier said than done, as service providers are grappling with dated, legacy systems and lack expertise in areas such as device security and niche application management. Service providers are looking for a comprehensive enterprise mobility solution provider that will enable them to overcome such hurdles and provide enhanced services.

Enterprises have high expectations when it comes to enterprise mobility. Service providers must have capabilities such as device and application management in place, ensure a highly secure mobile environment and give enterprise customers peace of mind as they allow employees to bring their own devices to work or down- load non-work-related applications. In order to provide such capabilities, service providers must have pillars in their operations such as embedded advanced analytics, which will enable real-time actionable insight as it allows for a more granular look at an enterprise customer's applications, network and data.

Service providers must also have a more modular approach to mobile services that allows for the independent development of different mobile areas (such as device and applications) – which will, in the end, enable greater agility in serving enterprise customers. It is also essential that service providers provide a flexible environment that is easily able to roll out new mobile applications to an enterprise as their needs quickly change.

In order for the industry to provide a more robust and flexible mobile enterprise eco- system, the key requirements are that service providers have a more innovative yet secure environment that will easily allow for the management of mobile services without jeopardizing the enterprise customer's valued network or proprietary corporate information. Service providers must select a solution provider that will keep them up to date on modern-day device and application management. For example, today's service provider should be able to offer their enterprise customers such capabilities as app wrapping for policy and application management, and device management that prevents jail-breaking. Additionally, a next-generation enterprise mobility solution must easily integrate with a service provider's existing solutions. This will enable both the service provider and the end user to have a seamless, real-time mobile experience, which will promote efficiency and cost savings in the long run.

Ensuring Smooth Evolution and Improving User Experience - Huawei helps China Unicom in LTE construction for BCIA
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9/16/2014  | 

The time of LTE has come, leading to rapid data service growth. Network quality in hotspot areas is essential to customer perception. China Unicom had to think about the construction of hotspot areas such as airports, subways, and stadiums in the early stage of LTE deployment. Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA) is the largest airport in China and boasts the second highest traffic in the world. BCIA holds a lot of highend moving users. Quality LTE networks can bring a carrier good brand image and business value. Therefore, the indoor coverage for BCIA was listed as a key project of China Unicom in 2014.

Can Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Enhance Operator Monetization?
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9/15/2014  | 
Software-Defined Networking (SDN) is generating a lot of excitement, primarily as a way to simplify networking. It comes to the industry at a time when growing demand, greater service diversity, and increasing infrastructure complexity have challenged the ability of network operators to turn up and take down services quickly. By abstracting control from forwarding, SDN gives network operators more flexible and ostensibly more responsive central control of network traffic through a programmable network.
Cisco Open Network Environment: Adaptable Framework for the Internet of Everything
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9/15/2014  | 

Programmable networks provide one approach to meeting some of these challenges. Virtualization of network functions is another approach providers are pursuing to improve flexibility and service agility and significantly transform their economic cost models. Operations- and services-automation software capabilities are also required to dynamically accelerate and monetize the creation of new services. Solutions must address many different use cases and opportunities, necessitating a comprehensive and holistic approach that orchestrates programmable networking technologies along with multiple other powerful solutions. That is the vision of the Cisco® Open Network Environment (sometimes referred to as Cisco ONE).

This document presents current approaches to network programmability and provides an overview of the Cisco Open Network Environment. It also presents several use cases employing the Cisco Open Network Environment framework and technologies presented.

Cisco Network Convergence System: Building the Foundation for the Internet of Everything
Information Resources  | 
9/15/2014  | 

Cisco Network Convergence System (NCS) is a family of integrated packet routing and transport systems designed to help service providers capture their share of the IoE Value at Stake. NCS is built on major innovations in silicon, optics and software and provides the building blocks of a multilayer converged network that intelligently manages and scales functions across its architecture.

ACG Research analyzed the business case for NCS and found it achieves massive scale via multichassis system architecture, the density and performance of its new chip set, and the extension of the control plane to virtual machines (VM) internally and externally. Fully virtualized software improves service velocity and asset utilization by creating a cloud model inside the platforms. Virtualization also supports orders of magnitude improvement in system availability and security through the isolation and independence of software operations. Optical innovations lower multichassis interconnect costs and optimize wavelength density and cost.

Cisco Evolved Programmable Network: Enabling the Shift to New Business Models
Information Resources  | 
9/15/2014  | 

Service providers already face enormous demands on their network and data center assets from exploding mobility, video, and cloud-based applications. We are now in the era of the Internet of Everything (IoE) that will accelerate new metrics of scale never seen before. How can service providers reduce costs and improve efficiency and resource usage, even as they expand their business for new revenue-generating services?

According to The Cisco Visual Networking Index™ (Cisco VNI™), global network transformations will be accelerated by exponential growth in IP, cloud, mobile, video, and machine-to-machine (M2M) traffic growth. IP traffic alone will grow 300 percent to 1.4 zettabytes annually by 2017. With exponential growth comes opportunity. Cloud service providers have changed the rules of an age-old service-delivery game. Profitability is about rapidly delivering customer-focused, application-based services over lean, agile, automated IPv6 cloud-based networks.

In response to this game-changing shift, traditional telecommunication service providers will evolve their business models by taking advantage of innovations in software-defined networking (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV) technologies. Rewards of evolution will include intelligent flexibility for offering real-time repurposing of physical and virtual infrastructure - allowing providers to monetize and accelerate service delivery and capitalize on their unique link to the consumer and the data center.

Real-time, Open, and Intelligent - Key Capabilities of a Next-Generation OSS
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9/15/2014  | 

With the popularization of advanced network and ICT technology, all industries including transportation, medicine, education, payment, and business operations are being digitized. People's consumption patterns are also evolving, which is represented by the acronym "ROADS". Real-time: Ubiquitous ultra-broadband provides users with access to apps, services, and content anytime anywhere. On-demand: Users can access content and resources on demand. All-online: All services are available online 24/7, and are accessible to users anytime anywhere. DIY: Users can obtain personalized and customized products and services via Do It Yourself options/scenarios. Social: Communication is now increasingly performed on social networking sites (SNS) and apps.

For example, eHealth service is always online. Users can monitor their heart rate and blood pressure anytime. eHealth also supports realtime user health analysis. Users can configure parameters such as how regularly to measure heart rate, and can use these statistics to produce customized pie or bar charts to visualize the state of their health. They can then share these health reports with their friends online. Traditional voice and SMS services offered by telecom operators are no longer sufficient to satisfy customers' increasing communication needs. In an open digital economy, over-the-top (OTT) companies provide a rich variety of innovative services. Telco operating models are shifting from B2C to B2B2C. Meanwhile, thanks to diversification of network standards and networking models, such as heterogeneous networks (HetNets), the introduction of data center (DC) and IT devices, and the transition to software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV), telco infrastructure is becoming increasingly complex. To adapt to this new ecosystem, telcos must develop a next generation operations support system (OSS) – an Infrastructure Enabling System (IES) to tackle various challenges.

Building Quality Brand MBB Networks - Targeting User-Experience for Quality MBB Networks
Information Resources  | 
9/12/2014  | 

In recent years, with the large-scale deployment of Mobile Broadband (MBB) globally, especially LTE deployment, more and more users are accessing high-speed data services and are demanding superior service experience. Surveys conducted by Huawei at the 2013 Huawei User Congress reflect the same sentiments from the operators and the results of which are captured in this whitepaper.

Rewriting the Book on Mobile Fraud with Hadoop, Accumulo, and Petabyte-Scale Machine Learning
Information Resources  | 
9/12/2014  | 

Every industry can learn from data-intensive applications that have already been proven at massive scale at the NSA, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Etsy, and eBay.

Credit card companies have used Hadoop to achieve a 10-fold increase in the number of transaction aspects analyzed while running 16 distinct fraud models for different geographic and market segments. The ability to analyze 100% of transactions, up from only 2% of transactions, identifies $2 billion in fraud situations annually.

The mobile communications industry can save billions of dollars per year by adopting a similar approach.

The Communications Fraud Control Association (CFCA) “2013 Global Fraud Loss Survey” analyzed the $2.2 trillion mobile communications industry. It estimated that the industry is losing $46.3 billion per year from fraud, increasing at a rate of 15% from 2011.

MSO: Striding Towards Full-service Operation
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9/12/2014  | 

Fixed-line network services from European and US cable operators are growing steadily, according to the 2013 European Facts & Figures report from Cable Europe, and Industry Data from the National Cable and Telecommunications Association. Statistics show that in Europe and US there are 83 million cable subscribers out of 289 million broadband subscribers. These numbers are increasing at a stable rate.

Meanwhile, the revenue structure of Multi-Service Operators (MSOs) is also changing. Whilst traditional TV services are still a major income, the increasing revenue is mainly contributed by communication services like voice, broadband services, wireless and business services. This has led MSOs to diversify their services through pay TV, video Value-Added Service (VAS), fixed-line voice, broadband, mobile, and business services to keep the loyalty of their subscribers and find a new growth of their revenue. With these services, MSOs are in the fast lane to build ultra-broadband network for full service operations.

Harnessing the Power of HFC Node Facility
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9/12/2014  | 

The Outside Plant (OSP) of the HFC network, specifically the coaxial plant connecting the Optical Node to the subscribers, has seen its share of upgrades over the years but the network topologies stay essentially unchanged. In today’s highly competitive landscape, the multi-gigabit capacity of the coaxial plant stands as a key differentiator for the MSOs. A timely question is – how to best capture the full performance potential of the coaxial plant?

In trying to answer this question, this paper takes a close look at the coaxial plant as modular broadband access facilities. Along with a definition of the HFC node facility, several sizes of the node facility are applied to a bandwidth demand projection model to determine suitable starting points and migration steps. A series of commercially available baseband optical technologies are presented and compared.

As the analysis of this paper shows, the evolution of the HFC network has reached an inflection point where a combination of baseband optical technologies and optimized Ethernet Node is fully capable of meeting the cost-performance target and represents a promising HFC migration option.

D-CCAP: Fully Leveraging DOCSIS 3.1 Bandwidth Potential
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9/12/2014  | 

These survey results reveal a popular belief that D-CCAP will likely become the de-facto standard solution for CCAP. However for the past two decades, traditional CMTS networks have been the predominant broadband solution for MSOs globally. Why do so many industry experts believe that network architecture needs to be so fundamentally changed in the future?

First, as global networks move towards ultra-broadband ubiquity, people are demanding a better bandwidth experience at all times and in all locations. To meet these requirements, efforts are not only made by telecommunications carriers to upgrade existing networks and deploy new technologies, but also by MSOs to seize new broadband development opportunities to speed up networks and increase bandwidth. Major measures taken by MSOs to increase bandwidth include accelerating the node-segmentation process, introducing DOCSIS 3.1 technology, and implementing hybrid fiber coaxial (HFC) networks. Using a distributed architecture, MSOs can improve the deployment efficiency of these measures and save investment at the same time.

Accelerating NFV Though Common Extensions to NFV Infrastructure & NFVI Management
Information Resources  | 
9/11/2014  | 
Telefónica, one of the main supporters and adopters of network functions virtualization (NFV), believes the full benefits of functions virtualization can only be gained if the industry can agree on a common NFV infrastructure (NFVI) and Virtualized Infrastructure Manager (VIM). This white paper, written by Heavy Reading’s Caroline Chappell, explains the challenges and requirements associated with the development and adoption of a common NFVI and VIM.
Optimizing Mobile Backhaul - Breaking the 4G Bottleneck
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9/11/2014  | 

According to a mobile Internet white paper, mobile terminals have become people's primary portal to obtain information. Mobile phones today provide not only simple voice and SMS services, they also offer entertainment, SNS, video-on-demand/video surveillance, and high-speed Internet access services. In the future, video, SNS, and web browsing services will be the major data consumption services. Data consumed on video and micro blogs by Android/iOS devices will make up 50% of all data. Smartphones bring the surge of data consumption. The explosive increase in data consumption prompts global carriers to accelerate LTE deployment, and imposes an even higher demand on the mobile backhaul network.

The deployment of LTE improves the bandwidth of wireless air interfaces. However, the traditional mobile backhaul network has become a bottleneck for LTE deployment. It restricts the upstream and downstream traffic flow and compromises user experience. The bandwidth of LTE networks is dozens of times higher than that of 3G networks. This means that the LTE backhaul network must be able to continuously evolve to higher bandwidth, meet the dynamic requirements of wireless technology, and flexibly interoperate with hybrid networks.

Huangcun IDC of China Unicom Beijing - China's First Warehouse Micro-modular IDC
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9/10/2014  | 

China Unicom Beijing (hereinafter referred to as Beijing Unicom below) has reconstructed its two unused warehouses in Huangcun, Beijing, with a total area of 5600 square meters, into an Internet data center (IDC) using a warehouse micro-modular IDC solution. It is the first warehouse micro-modular IDC project in China. This project reuses idle assets to improve asset utilization and rapidly completes IDC deployment using on-demand planning, component prefabrication, and field assembling, helping Beijing Unicom seize market opportunities. The new IDC contributes to 50% of China Unicom Group's IDC business revenue. Beijing Unicom is planning its phase-2 IDC project, which will be composed of two equipment rooms covering a total area of 37,000 square meters. This new warehouse data center design won the "Innovation in Medium Data Center" award of Data Center Dynamics (DCD), which is considered as the "Oscar" in the data center industry.

Network Sharing
Information Resources  | 
9/9/2014  | 

Operators globally are embracing network sharing as a viable option to reduce their operating expense and capital spending, improve and/or expand coverage, reduce time to market, and to focus more on network and technology refresh. With networks mature in most regions of the world and service quality becoming the prime differentiator among the operators, network sharing is inevitable.

Operators are more focused on the type of network sharing model to use and how best to cooperate with their competitors in sharing their networks while retaining control of their networks as much as possible. This of course brings certain level of complexities into the network in terms of execution and operations which needs to be managed carefully.

Huawei's Self-Improving OSS
Information Resources  | 
9/8/2014  | 

As a managed services (MS) solution, Huawei's operations support system (OSS) solution has long been serving the telecom industry. Huawei has developed a set of mature products and telecom value assets thanks to network O&M experience gained from hundreds of global MS projects. Huawei's OSS asset library is completely decoupled from products. It is independently developed, offered, and deployed, and can interoperate with OSS products from other vendors.

Huawei's OSS solution matches customers' business process, offering the following key benefits:

  • Resource Management Facilitates Service Provisioning
  • Fault Management Improves Customer Service Efficiency
  • Automatic TT Management
  • Test and Diagnosis Accelerate Fault Location and Troubleshooting
  • Field Management: Right Personnel at Right Place and at Right Time
  • Active Performance Management and Assurance
Huawei Optical Innovation Forum - Event Summary from Nice France
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9/4/2014  | 

On June 23rd, more than 170 attendees from network operators, service providers, analyst firms, and component companies from around the world convened in Nice for the inaugural Optical Innovation Forum, including Telecom Italia, Telefonica, NTT, JDSU, OVUM, and Current Analysis.

Co-produced by Light Reading and Huawei, the Optical Innovation Forum was envisioned as an open forum for the optical networking industry to gather and share knowledge and experiences on next-generation optical innovations.

This one-day conference is designed to ensure highly focused communication across all segments of the optical transport market’s value chain, including traditional telecom network operator, over-the-top service providers, system suppliers, components suppliers, and standards and telecom regulatory representatives. To achieve this aims, the live event consists of a mix of lively debate panels, keynotes from leading service provider innovators, app demo, active audience participation, and valuable networking opportunities in between the formal sessions. The content for the Optical Innovation Forum was developed to capture the business and technology issues affecting optical networking professionals today and also to anticipate the issues, challenges, and opportunities of the next five years.

Web Security Using Cisco WSA - Technology Design Guide
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9/2/2014  | 

Cisco Validated designs (CVds) provide the framework for systems design based on common use cases or current engineering system priorities. They incorporate a broad set of technologies, features, and applications to address customer needs. Cisco engineers have comprehensively tested and documented each CVd in order to ensure faster, more reliable, and fully predictable deployment.

CVDs include two guide types that provide tested and validated design and deployment details:

  • Technology design guides provide deployment details, information about validated products and software, and best practices for specific types of technology.
  • Solution design guides integrate or reference existing CVDs, but also include product features and functionality across Cisco products and may include information about third-party integration.

Both CVD types provide a tested starting point for Cisco partners or customers to begin designing and deploying systems using their own setup and configuration.

Cisco 2014 Mid-Year Security Report
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9/2/2014  | 

Any cyberattack, large or small, is born from a weak link in the security chain. Weak links can take many forms: outdated software, poorly written code, an abandoned website, developer errors, a user who blindly trusts. Adversaries are committed to finding these weak links, one and all, and using them to their full advantage.

Unfortunately, for the organizations and users targeted, malicious actors do not have to look long or hard for those weaknesses. In the rapidly emerging Internet of Everything, which ultimately builds on the foundation of the connectivity within the Internet of Things, their work will be made even easier, as anything connected to a network, from automobiles to home automation systems, presents an attack surface to exploit.

The effects of cyberattacks are sobering, in terms of both costs and losses in productivity and reputation. According to the Ponemon Institute, the average cost of an organizational data breach was US$5.4 million in 2014, up from US$4.5 million in 2013. In addition, the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Estimating the Cost of Cyber Crime and Cyber Espionage report estimates that US$100 billion is lost annually to the U.S. economy, and as many as 508,000 U.S. jobs are lost, because of malicious online activity.

Email Security Using Cisco ESA - Technology Design Guide
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9/2/2014  | 

Cisco Validated designs (CVds) provide the framework for systems design based on common use cases or current engineering system priorities. They incorporate a broad set of technologies, features, and applications to address customer needs. Cisco engineers have comprehensively tested and documented each CVd in order to ensure faster, more reliable, and fully predictable deployment.

CVDs include two guide types that provide tested and validated design and deployment details:

  • Technology design guides provide deployment details, information about validated products and software, and best practices for specific types of technology.
  • Solution design guides integrate or reference existing CVDs, but also include product features and functionality across Cisco products and may include information about third-party integration.

Both CVD types provide a tested starting point for Cisco partners or customers to begin designing and deploying systems using their own setup and configuration.

Criteria for Advanced Malware Protection Buyers Guide
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9/2/2014  | 

It’s no secret that today’s advanced attackers have the resources, expertise, and persistence to compromise any organization at any time. Malware is pervasive. Traditional defenses, including firewalls and endpoint protection, are no longer effective against these attacks, which means that the process of handling malware must evolve, and quickly at that.

Malware and the targeted, persistent attacks they represent are a bigger problem than a single point-in-time control or product can effectively address on its own. Advanced Malware Protection (AMP) must become as pervasive as the malware it is designed to combat. Such protection requires an integrated set of controls and a continuous process to detect, confirm, track, analyze, and remediate these threats before, during and after an attack. Defenses on the network, endpoint, and everywhere in between must be integrated to address ever-expanding attack vectors.

The problem is going to get worse before it gets better. With the rise of polymorphic malware, organizations face tens of thousands of new malware samples per hour, and attackers can rely on fairly simple malware tools to compromise a device. The blacklist approach of matching a file to signatures of known bad malware no longer scales to keep pace, and newer detection techniques, like sandboxing, are not 100 percent effective. In addition, cybercriminals are increasingly harnessing the power of the Internet’s infrastructure, not just individual computers, to launch attacks. In a testament to how pervasive this technique has become, Cisco’s 2014 Annual Security Report shows that all the Fortune 500 companies interviewed for the report had traffic going to websites that host malware. Extending protection to include email and web gateways is essential.

Brazil World Cup: A Digital Sports Feast
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8/28/2014  | 

During the World Cup, Brazil welcomed over 1.5 million tourists and over 3.3 million fans watched the games live. Outside the stadium, millions of fans gathered on Copacabana Beach and in bars and hotels. They used smartphones, laptops, tablets, and even smart watches and glasses to access the Internet, updating Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, and WeChat. They shared in real time every twist and turn of each game by uploading pictures and video clips or chatting with friends and families using these popular social media and messaging apps. Media agencies from over 100 countries and regions also broadcast-live the event to the whole world.

Statistics show that during the games, the number of mobile users in Brazil increased by 48% and data traffic consumption quadrupled. During July 13's final game, more than 70,000 live spectators uploaded 2.6 million pictures, consuming roughly 1.43 million MB of data. Compared to the South Africa 2010 World Cup when only 3G coverage was available, this year's World Cup was an indisputable digital sports feast.

Frost & Sullivan Report 2014: Huawei Ranked First in the Global DC Power Systems Market
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8/15/2014  | 
Frost & Sullivan, a global consulting firm, has found that Huawei, a leading information and communications technology (ICT) provider, holds the number one position in DC power systems sales for 2013 in their latest “Analysis of the Global DC (Direct Current) Power Systems Market” report. It states that Huawei held a 24.7% share of the market in 2013, attributed to “its robust product line and its successful growth strategy in key geographies”, as well as “higher power to compete on performance due to its solid telecom background.” Furthermore, Huawei’s strengths were noted as having the “highest rectifier efficiency, flexible system, brand equity fostered by inherent presence in telecom.”
Expanded Test Capabilities: Suddenlink™ and DOCSIS® 3.0 Case Study
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8/13/2014  | 
This case study looks at Suddenlink’s deployment of DOCSIS 3.0. Suddenlink began launching DOCSIS 3.0-based services in 2008, migrating to DOCSIS 3.0-capable test and measurement (T&M) equipment two years later. In doing so, it seized the opportunity to expand capabilities, opting for a platform that simplified multiple testing requirements, interfaced with workforce management systems, enabled several communication paths and leveraged server-based efficiencies. This work in turn catalyzed similar integrations across the industry.
Cable Basics Wall Chart
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8/13/2014  | 
A detailed and informative wall chart including RF/QAM, DOCSIS 3.0 Ethernet/IP, MPEG, VoIP/MOS, and T1/ISDN PRI technologies.
MSO Catalog
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8/13/2014  | 
Finding the right test equipment to maximize the performance and potential of an MSO’s network does not have to be a daunting task. Cable operators and MSOs worldwide depend on VeEX solutions every day to stay ahead. Download VeEX’s MSO Catalog to view their cable product portfolio.
Equalizer Measurements White Paper
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8/13/2014  | 
The purpose of a test instrument is to make measurements in the network, to note its good health or to discover problems. The instrument has a set of measurements and the interpretation of the results gives hindsight into the source of the problem. In the QAM as well as the 8-VSB modes, there is a large group of measurements that derive their results from a single element in the instrument: the Equalizer. This white paper looks at correcting the problem by understanding the meaning of each measurement.
Growing Your Audience and Business with Video Syndication
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8/7/2014  | 

The most obvious benefit to syndication is that more viewers will have access to your content. With that added visibility comes other benefits, such as increased exposure to your brand, additional revenue streams, and new business relationships. So why aren’t more content owners doing it? They may be focused solely on making their own website a prime destination, keeping their content exclusive to their own portal. In some scenarios, that approach makes sense, especially for organizations that only deliver premium content that’s of high demand. But for most content owners, syndication allows you to compete with the myriad of online channels fighting for your consumers’ attention span.

Unlike traditional print, radio, and TV, viewers are naturally self-selecting their favorite sites, content, and viewing experiences. Their online experience is about their relationship with the video — not with the content owner or distributor. They’re also seeking content in non-linear ways, and when they find what they like, they quickly abandon the host site if there isn’t additional content they want, or if the content isn’t fresh. Consumers’ brand loyalty will always come second to convenience. So what to do? Start by engaging your consumers over a wider network.

Rise of the Software-Empowered Video Operator II - Progressive IP and Software-Based Ecosystems Deliver the Future
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8/7/2014  | 

In this original e-book, "Rise of the Software-Empowered Video Operator," you'll see a high-level picture of the significant shift away from specialized and proprietary hardware towards software-centric and IP-based technologies and subsystems that create the fabric of new video service delivery systems. It provides an overview of the trends that underpin this transition, the historical software paradigm shifts that parallel the current environment, and the implications for operators that want to benefit from the inherent advantages of software and IP-based technologies.

For operators to successfully navigate this software and IP transition, it is clear that the value of a robust and reliable vendor partner ecosystem cannot be underestimated. No single company can — or should — provide all of the components of the infrastructure. Building and sustaining a network of strategic alliances with progressive video technology providers and CE manufacturers offers a wide range of advantages, including proven technology integration, ease of operation and extended value, which you will read more about in each chapter.

In fact, part of the power of this rapidly evolving environment is the ability to integrate new and specialized functional blocks, especially when combined with the greatly reduced switching costs of vendor migration. Many technology providers have developed IP-centric and software-based solutions because they recognize these opportunities and understand what is at stake for operators.

Mobile Network Outages & Service Degradations: A Heavy Reading Survey Analysis
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8/5/2014  | 
The summer of 2013 saw several major outages impacting the IT infrastructure of Internet giants such as Amazon, Apple, Google and Microsoft, as well as Nasdaq. As mobile network operators undertake the transition from voice-oriented to data-oriented, they are becoming increasingly vulnerable to new types of data networking outages. This is due to the growing complexity of the mobile network as it becomes increasingly IP-centric. Leveraging a survey of 76 online respondents, as well as detailed operator interviews, this Heavy Reading report provides unique visibility into how mobile operators are faring with the transition to mobile broadband.
Leveraging Service Assurance Investments For CEM, Business, And Operational Insight
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8/5/2014  | 
An incisive speaker at a large telecom trade show recently said that if Alexander Graham Bell were presented with a modern smartphone he would not recognize it as the progeny of his creation. Whether or not this is accurate (Bell was brilliant and smartphones are intuitive by design), the point is profound: the telecommunications landscape has changed more dramatically in the past six years than in the preceding ninety years.
Virtualizing Small Cell Performance Monitoring
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8/5/2014  | 

The exponential growth in demand for capacity in the mobile network is driving mobile carriers and backhaul providers to complement their macro cell deployments with small cell networks. Microcells offer cost-effective relief for both bandwidth capacity and radio coverage challenges faced by many mobile operators. As mobile carriers own less and less of their backhaul infrastructure, there are important lessons that can be gleaned from the recent trend by mobile carriers to outsource operation of mobile backhaul network to wholesale providers.

Effective outsourcing requires oversight and active management in order to ensure a high quality end-user experience. Performance assurance systems are required for the Carrier Ethernet networks that deliver backhaul services to macro and micro cells alike. These tools provide mobile carriers with the management information they need to effectively leverage the cost advantages and extensibility of a microcell-based mobile backhaul network.

The 3 "V"s which are: circuit verification; SLA validation; and on-going visibility into the performance of the backhaul network require Carrier Ethernet/IP OAM support. Effective performance management systems include comprehensive instrumentation in the network along with complementary management tools able to summarize thousands of measured data points into concise and actionable performance information. Performance assurance is the key to successfully delivering high quality mobile service.

This short paper outlines an effective strategy that adapts the best practices for performance assurance in macro cell networks, to small cell deployments. Virtualizing the OAM instrumentation enables performance management systems to be applied cost-effectively to small cells. This provides the management oversight required to effectively leverage micro cell technology to build out additional mobile bandwidth and extend radio coverage.

Blind SDN vs. Insightful SDN in a Mobile Backhaul Environment Extending SDN with Network State+™
Information Resources  | 
8/5/2014  | 

While the major benefits of Software Defined Networking (SDN) are relatively well understood and agreed; namely: separation of the control and forwarding planes, logically centralized software control and programmability, driving utilization, rapid innovation, manageability and infrastructure cost reduction. But the approaches to maximizing its benefits vary greatly. In some instances the approach can differ simply because of the state of the technology available to the one proposing the solution. What is not in dispute is that the more accurate the information feeding the abstracted network model, built by the SDN platform, the better the results.

SDN’s initial growth has largely been driven within the datacenter where network infrastructure is relatively easy to procure and provision. In this type of environment, it is largely safe to make assumptions about the expected performance and availability of the underlying network as new traffic flows are considered. This is effectively demonstrated by the fact that OpenFlow itself is very limited in its ability to deliver measurements of performance metrics such as latency. This occurs since OpenFlow is a control-plane protocol that inherently has great difficulty in accurately determining data-plane measurements.

As network operators look to expand the benefits they can get from SDN beyond the datacenter and across the WAN, the need to further enhance the information available to help in decision making is increased. Decisions based on a static snapshot (reporting of data at specific times in data centers) of the "expected" or designed performance characteristics of the available network infrastructure cannot hope to offer the same results as one based on constantly updated measured results.

Scaling Mobile Network Security for LTE: A Multi-Layer Approach by Heavy Reading
Information Resources  | 
8/1/2014  | 

The way the network security domain has been pieced together over time has served mobile operators well enough until now. By and large, it has enabled operators to "keep the lights on" and minimize the impact of network incidents on subscribers. But the business model and technology environment are changing fundamentally today, and if the network security domain doesn't evolve with that, it will risk compromising operators' ability to protect the network, maintain stability and manage millions of real-time sessions, without costs spiraling out of control.

The threat landscape is evolving to generate increasingly threatening outcomes, be they from malicious attacks or benign network incidents, and the technology and architecture of the mobile network is transforming. The seismic shift to all-IP networking protocols is exposing the operator to more threats, while virtualization provides new opportunities to render the security architecture more flexible and ultimately more robust and effective. A network security domain that is fit for purpose in the emerging LTE era will increasingly require a multi-layer approach across all the key layers and locations in the network. A dynamic, multi-layer approach will need to leverage virtualization and service chaining, as well as real-time subscriber awareness from the 3GPP policy environment.

This white paper provides a blueprint for how mobile operators can stay ahead of the curve of both benign and malign security threats. It examines how operators can adapt and scale their security architecture for tremendous traffic growth on both the user and signaling planes, and it explores how they can dynamically adjust their security posture in line with changes in the security threat landscape, new capabilities in telco networking and changes in customer demand.

Unlocking the Power of Context to Manage Network Growth
Information Resources  | 
8/1/2014  | 
With the growth in mobile data, operators face more than an increase in the volume of traffic. The complexity of managing that traffic has also intensified, driven by subscribers expecting an ever-higher quality of experience (QoE), and by a traffic and device mix, usage patterns and advanced policy-based services that are more diverse and continue to evolve. This complexity creates an additional set of challenges. Operators not only have to expand capacity, they need to decide how to use that capacity in a way that maximizes the return on their 4G investment, in terms of improving both network utilization (i.e., lowering their per-bit costs) and the subscriber's QoE (i.e., increasing revenues and customer retention). This paper presents five use cases that illustrate the challenges that mobile operators face in managing traffic, the tools they can use to address them, and the benefits they can reap from real-time, context-aware traffic management.
Mobility Management
Information Resources  | 
7/31/2014  | 
See how HP Mobility Management, with Intel® Itanium®-powered HP NonStop servers, helps you better manage subscriber data across 3G/LTE/WiFi networks.
The Era of Homogeneous Service Delivery Networks
Information Resources  | 
7/31/2014  | 
See how network operators and vendors are adopting new approaches to usher in the era of true mobile services ubiquity.
Simplify and Automate for Enhanced Service Agility
Information Resources  | 
7/31/2014  | 
Faster, changing market demands. Revenue pressures. New business models and applications. With so much in service provider environments in flux, it's no surprise that operational processes have to change as well. The Internet of Everything demands faster business responsiveness and economies of scale. Services and their features must be made available more quickly and with lower cost to ensure competitiveness and acceptable margins.
Network Optimization Through Visualization - Where, When and How?
Information Resources  | 
7/31/2014  | 
Virtualization is not a new concept but it is now being applied to network functions such as those in switches, routers, and the myriad network appliances deployed. The expectation is for sizable costs savings and greatly reduced network complexity. The early days of server virtualization had a dramatic impact on lowering server capital expenditures. Yet operational costs skyrocketed as more labor-intensive and complex processes were required. Eventually these costs were reined in with more integration of servers and network infrastructure and more advanced software capabilities. So what lessons can operators learn from the past experience with server virtualization? Beware of merely shifting costs from capital to operating expenditures. Be selective in virtualizing the right resources and functions driven by the business need, and not the technology lure. Let lowering total cost of ownership with a flexible, adaptable infrastructure be your focus in regard to optimization.
Information Privacy: Carriers Need to Be Savvy, Loud & Proud - by Heavy Reading
Information Resources  | 
7/30/2014  | 
The so-called Snowden revelations have permanently altered the global ICT landscape. While the Googles and Facebooks of this world have responded loudly and strongly, the response of telcos thus far has been comparatively meek. This white paper looks at how telcos and leading over-the-top (OTT) players are adjusting to the Post-Snowden era, what's at stake and what the operators need to do to reinforce their competitive positioning in regards to user privacy. Ironically, one of the things the operators must do is ensure that key aspects of their security and privacy strategies are fully aligned.
A Network Fabric Is the Foundation for Data Center Evolution
Information Resources  | 
7/25/2014  | 
Don't Lose the Data: Six Ways You May Be Losing Mobile Data and Don't Even Know It - by Symantec
Information Resources  | 
7/9/2014  | 

This paper briefly reviews the top six threats to your mobile workforce, matching real-world hazards with really helpful ways you can take action and achieve the security your business requires.

State of Mobility Global Results - by Symantec
Information Resources  | 
7/9/2014  | 

Symantec commissioned ReRez Research to carry out the 2013 State of Mobility Survey, in September and October of 2012. They spoke with 3,236 individuals at organizations in 29 countries. Respondents included small and medium-sized businesses (with between 5 and 249 employees) to large enterprises with more than 5,000 employees. Those surveyed were the individuals in charge of computing, either a senior member of IT staff at large companies, or often the de facto IT person at smaller organizations.

The Security Differentiator for the Next Phase of M2M Growth - by Heavy Reading
Information Resources  | 
7/9/2014  | 

Definitions of the machine-to-machine (M2M) market - and the extent to which it differs from, overlaps with, or is identical to the market defined as the Internet of Things (IoT) - tend to vary quite a lot within the telecom and IT industries. The M2M market tends to be associated with deployments that are served by telecom service providers, as distinct from self-contained industrial applications in which machines intercommunicate across a LAN without transiting the WAN. This paper discusses the M2M market served by service providers.

Scoping a Security Orchestration Ecosystem for SDN/NFV - by Heavy Reading
Information Resources  | 
7/9/2014  | 

Software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) are expected to have a transformational effect on operator networks. Both approaches to network virtualization will affect every part of the operator's network organization, touching how network functionality is delivered, where network function is deployed and run, the infrastructure on which it executes, the processes and systems used to manage it and the security mechanisms that protect the network.

Network security will need to be able to handle new use cases, such as application/tenant-driven networking, where specific network "slices" will be spun up dynamically, on demand. Extensions to security mechanisms will be required to handle the virtualization of network functions and the new vulnerabilities and threats posed by network virtualization. And security mechanisms that have been implemented discretely, in different physical and virtual domains in the past, will need to work seamlessly together to protect the emerging software-defined infrastructure, of which SDN is a part, and which supports NFV.

This paper argues that operators need a holistic approach to security management in a virtualized networking environment. Such an approach should leverage the orchestration, automation and open application programming interface (API) technologies appearing in SDN controller and NFV infrastructure management products. A software-defined security controller (SDSC) would coordinate, in a consistent and "joined up" way, the application of security functions to software-defined architecture components, including virtual network functions (VNFs) and the virtual and physical compute, storage and network resources that support them.

In this paper, we define the scope of the SDSC, its design principles and components. It is likely that ecosystems of security product vendors will coalesce around candidate SDSCs, and such ecosystems will need to interoperate with multiple SDN controller and NFV management and orchestration vendors. An SDSC and its eco- system must be open and inclusive. By committing to openness, the SDSC ensures that operators can update their security capabilities and meet new security requirements as these emerge. Section II examines the impact SDN and NFV will have on network security and dis- cusses the requirement for a "joined up" approach to security, across all elements of the software-defined infrastructure, that both technologies are imposing. Section III defines the SDSC, its benefits, attributes and capabilities. Section IV examines the requirement for an SDSC ecosystem and what operators should look for in a candidate SDSC.

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Sales Director of INIT on Plug & Play Switch Devices

9|19|14   |   3:21   |   (0) comments


INIT Italy uses both the Huawei S5700 and S7700 series switches for the campus LAN environment. Sales Director Andrea Curti says their company chose these Huawei devices over others because of their performance, flexible scalability and plug-and-play features.
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Saudi Arabia Upgrades Vocational Training System

9|19|14   |   3:31   |   (0) comments


The Technical and Vocational Training Corporation (TVTC) has 100,000 students, 150 government-owned institutions and oversees 1000 private institutes. The CIO of TVTC explains that Huawei devices have allowed them to manage multiple datacenters using just one software program, scientifically tracking the progress of students and teachers, saving them millions.
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Huawei's Media Solutions Are Here to Stay

9|19|14   |   4:35   |   (0) comments


The current media revolution requires rapid upgrades in technology. New formats (HD, 3D, 4K etc.) and the subsequent explosion of file sizes demand sophisticated network and storage architecture. Social media and the multiple distribution channels require a robust asset management system. Gartner analyst Venecia Liu speaks about the current technological trends in ...
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Microgenesis on Huawei's Switches

9|19|14   |   3:57   |   (0) comments


Microgenesis is a solutions and system integrator company in the Philippines whose areas of expertise include data centers, networking and security products. In this video, Executive Director Jeffrey Choa talks to us about his customers needs and they benefit from using Huawei switches.
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Network Solutions Help the Philippines Jump Ahead

9|17|14   |   2:59   |   (0) comments


In the past, the Philippines has under-invested in technology. Now, the CEO of Softshell talks about how Huawei products help the Philippines jump ahead as the economy improves.
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VCS Observation for Safer Cities in the Netherlands

9|17|14   |   5:20   |   (0) comments


Holland's VCS Observation has been operating for 22 years. Its main goal is to get cities safer. CEO Wim van Deijzen tells us some of the challenges his company faces and how Huawei is helping to overcome these challenges.
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A Conversation With Serbia's Ministry of Interior

9|17|14   |   4:38   |   (0) comments


At HCC 2014, the Assistant Minister of the Ministry of Interior of the Republic of Serbia talks to us about his projects and corporation with Huawei. Solutions like Safe City and E-Government and services like cloud computing are just some of the areas his department is interested in.
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IHS Analyst Discusses eLTE at CCW 2014

9|10|14   |   7:09   |   (0) comments


Thomas Lynch, associate director of critical communications at IHS Technology, talks about broadband in critical communications.
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TCAA on Huawei eLTE: A Broadband Solution for Mission-Critical Communications

9|10|14   |   2:29   |   (0) comments


At CCW2014 in Singapore, the TCCA's Phil Kidner talks about the importance of broadband data for critical communications.
LRTV Custom TV
Spotlight on Cisco: SDN for Optical Networks

9|8|14   |   9:27   |   (0) comments


Cisco's Greg Nehib talks OpenFlow and more on the 'Software-Defined Networking for Optical Networks' panel at the Big Telecom Event in June 2014.
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Cisco's Evolved Programmable Network (EPN)

9|8|14   |   4:05   |   (0) comments


A look at the various demos Cisco showed at Light Reading's Big Telecom Event highlighting Cisco's EPN innovation and how SDN and NFV technologies are enabling a variety of new services.
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The Future of Ultra-Broadband, With Kevin Kelly (UBBF2014)

9|5|14   |   1:13   |   (1) comment


If you think the technological changes we've seen up to now are astounding, just wait until you see what the future has in store. Discuss upcoming breakthroughs with Kevin Kelly, Founding Executive Editor of Wired Magazine, at the Huawei Ultra-Broadband Forum on September 24.
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